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NCJRS Abstract

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NCJ Number: 69706 Find in a Library
Title: Key Is Understanding
Corporate Author: National Institute on Mental Retardation
York University Campus
Canada

Stanfield House Films/Media
United States of America
Date Published: 1978
Sponsoring Agency: Canada Dept of National Health and Welfare
Ottawa, Ontario K1A 1B4, Canada
National Institute on Mental Retardation
Toronto, Ontario M3J 1P3, Canada
Not Available Through National Institute of Justice/NCJRS Document Loan Program
Rockville, MD 20849
Stanfield House Films/Media
Santa Monica, CA 90403
Sale Source: Not Available Through National Institute of Justice/NCJRS Document Loan Program
Rockville, MD 20849
United States of America

National Institute on Mental Retardation
York University Campus
4700 Keele Street
Downsview
Toronto, Ontario M3J 1P3,
Canada
Language: English
Country: Canada
Annotation: This Canadian film was developed to assist law enforcement officers who encounter handicapped persons, and it emphasizes the need of the handicapped to be treated with equality and dignity.
Abstract: Varied film sequences show law enforcement officers leading a blind person across an intersection, helping a retarded person to find his workshop, and sending a taxi for a physically handicapped person. The film emphasizes that blind, cerebral palsied, or other physically handicapped individuals should be considered to have normal intelligence; that stereotypes of handicapped persons persist; and that community services for handicapped persons are a basic right. Like the rest of the population, the handicapped can be lawabiding citizens or offenders. It is important to develop accurate information about the handicapped and to know about available community resources. A comprehensive training manual accompanies this film.
Index Term(s): Audiovisual aids; Canada; Films; Persons with Disabilities; Police community relations
Note: *This document is currently unavailable from NCJRS. 15 minutes, 16mm color. 1978. Rental also available
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http://www.ncjrs.gov/App/publications/abstract.aspx?ID=69706

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