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NCJ Number: 69939 Add to Shopping cart Find in a Library
Title: JURISDICTION ON INDIAN RESERVATIONS - HEARINGS ON S 1181, S 1722, AND S 2832 BEFORE THE SENATE SELECT COMMITTEE ON INDIAN AFFAIRS, MARCH 17, 18, AND 19, 1980
Corporate Author: Kentucky State Police
Bureau of Identification
United States of America
Date Published: 1980
Page Count: 471
Sponsoring Agency: Kentucky State Police
Frankfort, KY 40601
National Institute of Justice/
Rockville, MD 20849
Sale Source: National Institute of Justice/
NCJRS paper reproduction
Box 6000, Dept F
Rockville, MD 20849
United States of America
Document: PDF
Language: English
Country: United States of America
Annotation: Testimony given at hearings before the Select Committee on Indian Affairs of the U.S. Senate covers three bills concerned with jurisdiction on Indian reservations.
Abstract: Senate bill 1181 authorizes the States and the Indian tribes to enter into manual agreements and compacts respecting jurisdiction and governmental operations in Indian country. Senate bill 1722, the bill to reform the Federal criminal law, contains one part relevant to Indian affairs, section 161(i), which deals with retrocession of jurisdiction to the United States from States that previously assumed jurisdiction under Public Law 83-280. The final bill, Senate bill 2832, establishes a special magistrate with jurisdiction over Federal offenses within Indian country and authorizes tribal and local police officers to enforce Federal laws within their respective jurisdictions, and for other purposes. Testimony of numerous witnesses is presented, including that of officials from the Department of Justice, tribal council members of several Indian tribes (Chemehuevi, Blackfeet, Yakima, and Choctaw), the Federal Bureau of Investigation, and the National Tribal Chairmen's Association. The text of the bills is included, as well as additional related material. Footnotes are provided. Statements received subsequent to the hearings are appended.
Index Term(s): American Indians; Federal government; Federal law violations; Indian affairs; Jurisdiction; Legislation; Reservation crimes; Reservation law enforcement; State government
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http://www.ncjrs.gov/App/publications/abstract.aspx?ID=69939

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