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NCJ Number: 74388 Find in a Library
Title: Trends in Public Information Within the Fairfax (VA) Alcohol Safety Action Project, 1976 - Final Report
Author(s): C Lynn
Corporate Author: Virginia Highway and Transportation Research Council
United States of America
Date Published: 1979
Page Count: 47
Sponsoring Agency: National Technical Information Service
Springfield, VA 22151
US Dept of Transportation National Highway Traffic Safety Admin
Washington, DC 20590
Virginia Highway and Transportation Research Council
Charlottesville, VA 22903
Contract Number: DOT HS-067-1-087
Sale Source: National Technical Information Service
US Dept of Commerce
5285 Port Royal Road
Springfield, VA 22151
United States of America
Document: PDF
Type: Program Description (Model)
Language: English
Country: United States of America
Annotation: This report summarizes the findings of a roadside and telephone survey conducted to assess current trends in the effectiveness of the public information and education countermeasures of the Fairfax Safety Action Project (Virginia). The project is a community-based demonstration program to reduce alcohol-related traffic accidents.
Abstract: The area involved in the project includes Fairfax County, Fairfax City, Vienna, Falls Church, and Herndon. The project implemented four basic countermeasures: increased police enforcement during evening hours, special judicial procedures including probation and diagnosis, rehabilitation and treatment programs for those convicted of drunken driving, and a campaign of public information and education (the focus of this report). Data were selected from the six surveys and the 1975 and 1976 telephone surveys made in conjunction with the Fairfax project. From the telephone surveys it was found that the Fairfax community's awareness of both alcohol programs in general and the project in particular have declined drastically since 1974. Furthermore, knowledge of drinking and driving is not as high as during the mid-years of the project. Thus, substantial numbers of people are lacking the basic knowledge necessary to make rational decisions concerning how much they can drink and still drive. Also, the percentage of respondents who feel that it is a person's responsibility to intervene in a drunk driving situation has declined. However, the percentage of respondents intervening in drunk driving situations has increased over time. In general, there is little evidence to indicate that the public information countermeasure was effective in increasing awareness, increasing overall knowledge, or improving attitudes. This lack of objective improvement by 1976 could be related to the abolishment of the post of Public Information Director in 1976, although many negative trends in awareness, knowledge, and attitude had already been established by 1976. This further indicated that the public information countermeasure has not met its goals. Tables, footnotes, and appendixes presenting the survey forms and scales are included. (Author abstract modified).
Index Term(s): Alcohol-Related Offenses; Driving Under the Influence (DUI); Model programs; Public Attitudes/Opinion; Public education; Services effectiveness; Traffic offenses; Virginia
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