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NCJRS Abstract

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NCJ Number: 76771 Add to Shopping cart Find in a Library
Title: American Correctional Association - Proceedings of the One Hundred and Tenth Annual Congress of Correction
Corporate Author: American Correctional Assoc
United States of America
Editor(s): B H Olsson; A Dargis
Date Published: 1981
Page Count: 317
Sponsoring Agency: American Correctional Assoc
Alexandria, VA 22314
National Institute of Justice/
Rockville, MD 20849
Sale Source: American Correctional Assoc
206 N. Washington St., Suite 200
Alexandria, VA 22314
United States of America

National Institute of Justice/
NCJRS paper reproduction
Box 6000, Dept F
Rockville, MD 20849
United States of America
Language: English
Country: United States of America
Annotation: Influencing public policy was the theme of the 1980 program of the 110th Congress of the American Correctional Association. Papers highlighted such areas as the balance of offender needs and public safety, the alliance of the media and corrections, and citizen participation.
Abstract: The keynote address emphasized the importance of a well-run correctional system to national and international survival. Papers on correctional law and policy explored the role of the house counsel in corrections and presented U.S. and Canadian perspectives on correctional planning and on forging a national correctional policy. International corrections was examined in two papers dealing with the criminal justice system and the public in the Scandinavian countries and with corrections in Japan. Juvenile justice papers covered the topics of new directions in juvenile corrections, program development, and practical, individualized approaches to the education and treatment of juvenile offenders. In addition, the status of minorities in prison employment, ethnic relations in a correctional environment, and the impact of a displaced persons program for undocumented aliens were explored. Papers on probation and parole covered the impact of diminishing fiscal resources on probation, victim service programs in probation agencies, the need for probation officers to be seen as defenders of public safety rather than as managers of clients, the impact of parole guidelines on correctional management, and the interstate compact for the supervision of parolees and probationers. The concept of objective-based supervision was examined as well as probation and victim services. Additional subject areas included juvenile justice standards, stress management, the community and corrections, the news media, sociodrama, and female employees in male institutions. A summary report of the proceedings of the delegate assembly meeting, held in conjunction with the congress, is included. Charts, tables, illustrations, footnotes, and references are given. For individual papers, see NCJ 76772-76802.
Index Term(s): American Correctional Association (ACA); Behavior under stress; Canada; Correctional personnel; Females; Illegal Immigrants/Aliens; Inmate Programs; Japan; Juvenile Corrections/Detention; Juvenile justice standards; Juvenile treatment methods; Media support; Minorities; Probation or parole services; Scandinavia
Note: Held in San Diego, California, August 17-21, 1980.
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