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NCJRS Abstract

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NCJ Number: 77262 Find in a Library
Title: Emergency Vehicle Warning Systems
Author(s): A I Rubin; G L Howett
Corporate Author: US Dept of Commerce
National Bureau of Standards
Law Enforcement Standards Laboratory
United States of America
Date Published: 1981
Page Count: 25
Sponsoring Agency: National Institute of Justice (NIJ)
Washington, DC 20531
National Institute of Justice/
Rockville, MD 20849
Superintendent of Documents, GPO
Washington, DC 20402
US Dept of Commerce
Washington, DC 20234
US Dept of Justice NIJ Pub
Washington, DC 20531
Sale Source: Superintendent of Documents, GPO
Washington, DC 20402
United States of America

US Dept of Commerce
National Bureau of Standards
Law Enforcement Standards Laboratory
Washington, DC 20234
United States of America

National Institute of Justice/
NCJRS paper reproduction
Box 6000, Dept F
Rockville, MD 20849
United States of America
Document: PDF
Language: English
Country: United States of America
Annotation: Information on the effectiveness, physical configurations, and available types of emergency vehicle warning signals (lights and sirens) is provided, along with discussion on the preparation of a national standard for these signals.
Abstract: The report describes the factors hindering signal effectiveness, such as driver preoccupation with roadway congestion and automobile barriers against audible signals. Problems of signal variability are also discussed, including signal variability among emergency vehicles and a lack of uniformity among warning systems within and between communities. An analysis of warning systems outlines factors contributing to a good system, such as optimum conspicuity, environmental acceptability, and ease of use; describes the five different responses that are expected of a driver who is exposed to a warning signal; and gives the results of a limited number of tests conducted by the National Bureau of Standards on incandescent lamps and gaseous-discharge flash tubes, using the effective intensity as the important parameter. The report also describes the voluntary performance standard for emergency vehicle warning lights that is currently in preparation at the National Bureau of Standards. The standard's intent is to specify performance levels and test methods for warning light systems, irrespective of the color coding embodied in the systems. Finally, the report recommends steps that users can take to improve their emergency vehicle's visual and audible effectiveness where applicable laws and regulations permit. These include alternating color with white, using the largest bulbs possible, painting vehicles to be more conspicuous, and making certain that multiple sirens are in phase. Figures and tabular data are given; 11 references are appended.
Index Term(s): Emergency vehicle warning systems; Law Enforcement Standards Laboratory; Specifications
Note: Technology Assessment Program. A limited number of copies are available free from NBS.
To cite this abstract, use the following link:
http://www.ncjrs.gov/App/publications/abstract.aspx?ID=77262

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