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NCJ Number: 78190 Add to Shopping cart Find in a Library
Title: Trial Techniques - A Compendium of Course Materials, Third Edition
Corporate Author: National College of District Attorneys
College of Law
University of Houston
United States of America
Date Published: 1980
Page Count: 274
Sponsoring Agency: National College of District Attorneys
Houston, TX 77004
National Institute of Justice/
Rockville, MD 20849
US Dept of Justice
Washington, DC 20531
Sale Source: National College of District Attorneys
College of Law
University of Houston
Houston, TX 77004
United States of America

National Institute of Justice/
NCJRS paper reproduction
Box 6000, Dept F
Rockville, MD 20849
United States of America
Type: Instructional Material
Language: English
Country: United States of America
Annotation: This collection of 28 papers was prepared by lecturers for the National College of District Attorneys to tell prosecutors how to prepare and conduct court cases from jury selection to the closing argument.
Abstract: The importance of thorough preparation for trial is emphasized. For example, one paper advises prosecutors to prepare a case workbook which includes a chronological diary of everything pertaining to the case. Such actions as examination of police reports and rehearsal of examination and cross-examination of witnesses are also recommended. Suggestions are made on how to conduct voir dire to effect selection of jurors most likely to return a verdict of guilty. For example, factors to consider in jury selection should include relationships among the prospective jurors and the jurors' reactions to the defendant and the case. The purposes of the opening statement, its content, and the manner in which it should be delivered are discussed. The opening statement should acquaint the jury with the outline of the case as well as with trial procedures. Overstatement of the case in the opening statement may destroy the prosecutor's credibility. While delivering the statement, as well as throughout the trial, the prosecutor should maintain eye contact with the jurors. Recommendations are also given concerning direct examination. For example, questions for witnesses should be prepared in advance. Compound questions should be avoided. Witnesses should appear in the order which will highlight the various points that the prosecutor wants to make. Suggestions are made concerning handling police officers as witnesses and handling expert and hostile witnesses. Ways to meet such defenses as entrapment, self-defense, insanity, consent in rape cases, alibi, and duress are discussed. For example, to counter a self-defense argument, proof that the defendant has used excessive and unnecessary force is needed. The inexactness of psychiatry and psychology should be addressed to refute the insanity defense. Cross-examination of defense witnesses and the closing argument are also discussed. Relevant case law is examined and notes containing references are included. Authors' resumes are appended.
Index Term(s): Course materials; Jury selection; Pretrial procedures; Prosecutors; Reference materials; Trial preparation; Trial procedures
Note: *This document is currently unavailable from NCJRS. Trial Advocacy for Prosecutors series.
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