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NCJRS Abstract

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NCJ Number: 81697 Find in a Library
Title: Paint Solubility Testing
Author(s): J I Thornton; S Kraus; B Lerner; B Hendrickson
Corporate Author: US Dept of Commerce
National Bureau of Standards
Law Enforcement Standards Laboratory
United States of America

University of California
School of Public Health, Dept of Biomedical and Environmental Health Sciences
Forensic Scienc
Date Published: 1982
Page Count: 21
Sponsoring Agency: National Institute of Justice/
Rockville, MD 20849
University of California
Berkeley, CA 94720
US Dept of Commerce
Washington, DC 20234
US Dept of Justice
Washington, DC 20531
US Dept of Justice NIJ Pub
Washington, DC 20531
Publication Number: NBS-480-40
Sale Source: US Dept of Commerce
National Bureau of Standards
Law Enforcement Standards Laboratory
Washington, DC 20234
United States of America

National Institute of Justice/
NCJRS paper reproduction
Box 6000, Dept F
Rockville, MD 20849
United States of America
Document: PDF
Language: English
Country: United States of America
Annotation: This report presents the results of a study to develop criteria for the characterization of paint through solubility testing since standardization in testing is needed for forensic purposes.
Abstract: Developed by the Law Enforcement Standards laboratory, the report presents results from a study to determine criteria to apply to solubility testing and chemical reactivity of automotive paints and also to standardize reagent concentration and other parameters. The focus is on testing acrylic enamels used as automotive finishes, since prior to this study these paints were reported to be virtually unreactive to all solvents when subjected to solubility tests. An ancillary objective is to apply these criteria of solubility and reactivity to testing household paints. The study defines seven categories of reactivity which form the basis for specifying the extent of solubility of paints in various reagents under controlled conditions of time and temperature. A novel solubility test procedure is also developed by which acrylic lacquers, organic-dispersed enamels, and water-based enamels can be distinguished through sequential testing, a characterization not previously accomplished with solubility testing. The test involves the use of two reagents in tandem with one reagent used as an activator. This procedure represents a substantial breakthrough in the use of solubility testing for the characterization of automotive paints. Tables and charts are given.
Index Term(s): Evidence identification; Paint analysis; Trace evidence
Note: Limited number of free copies available from National Bureau of Standards, Law Enforcement Standards Laboratory (LESL), Technology Assessment Program.
To cite this abstract, use the following link:
http://www.ncjrs.gov/App/publications/abstract.aspx?ID=81697

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