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NCJ Number: 89593 Add to Shopping cart Find in a Library
Title: Implementing New Ideas in Criminal Justice
Author(s): P Ellickson; J Petersilia
Corporate Author: Rand Corporation
United States of America
Date Published: 1983
Page Count: 114
Sponsoring Agency: National Institute of Justice (NIJ)
Washington, DC 20531
National Institute of Justice/
Rockville, MD 20849
NCJRS Photocopy Services
Rockville, MD 20849-6000
Rand Corporation
Santa Monica, CA 90407-2138
US Dept of Justice NIJ Pub
Washington, DC 20531
Grant Number: 79-NI-AX-0085
Sale Source: Rand Corporation
1776 Main Street
P.O. Box 2138
Santa Monica, CA 90407-2138
United States of America

National Institute of Justice/
NCJRS paper reproduction
Box 6000, Dept F
Rockville, MD 20849
United States of America

NCJRS Photocopy Services
Box 6000
Rockville, MD 20849-6000
United States of America
Document: PDF
Type: Report (Study/Research)
Language: English
Country: United States of America
Annotation: Using case studies of 37 criminal justice innovations in five States and eight counties, this study identifies characteristics that distinguish successful from unsuccessful innovations as well as the strategies that promote the translation of new ideas into local criminal justice practice.
Abstract: Successful innovations were defined as those that altered organizational behavior and attitudes and made some progress toward achieving the innovation's original goals. The following characteristics were found to be key correlates of success: (1) sincere motivation at adoption; (2) support from top leadership combined with director and staff commitment and, where appropriate, external cooperation; (3) staff competence; (4) a benefit/cost surplus; (5) clarity of the innovation's goals and procedures; and (6) clear lines of authority. Because all but the first of these characteristics may change during implementation, the implementation process is also a crucial factor. The strategies for producing the correlates of success are producing multiple payoffs, ensuring key actor participation in planning and problemsolving over time, and incorporating a flexible problemsolving process. Success requires fusing all three of these strategies with four corollary features: an evolutionary approach that builds on prior achievement, craft-learning that enhances staff competence, ongoing planning, and regular communication. To cope with fiscal retrenchment, managers must distinguish between successful innovations that can absorb budget cuts and those that cannot. Appended are supplementary tables and interview guides. A total of 143 bibliographic entries are provided. (Author summary modified)
Index Term(s): Case studies; Change management; Reform
To cite this abstract, use the following link:
http://www.ncjrs.gov/App/publications/abstract.aspx?ID=89593

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