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NCJ Number: 90630 Find in a Library
Title: Impact of Mass Media Violence on US Homicides
Journal: American Sociological Review  Volume:48  Issue:4  Dated:(August 1983)  Pages:560-568
Author(s): D P Philips
Date Published: 1983
Page Count: 9
Format: Article
Language: English
Country: United States of America
Annotation: The impact of mass media violence on aggression has almost always been studied in the laboratory; this paper examines the effect of mass media violence in the real world.
Abstract: The paper presents the first systematic evidence indicating that a type of mass media violence triggers a brief, sharp increase in U.S. homicides. Immediately after heavyweight championship prize fights, 1973-1978, U.S. homicides increased by 12.46 percent. The increase is greatest aftr heavily publicized prize fights. The findings persist after one corrects for secular trends, seasonal, and other extraneous variables. Four alternative explanations for the findings are tested. The evidence suggests that heavyweight prize fights stimulate fatal, aggressive behavior in some Americans. (Author abstract)
Index Term(s): Aggression; Homicide; Media coverage; Sporting event violent behavior
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http://www.ncjrs.gov/App/publications/abstract.aspx?ID=90630

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