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NCJ Number: 92484 Find in a Library
Title: Non-Custodial Penal Sanctions in England and Wales - A New Utopia?
Journal: Howard Journal of Penology and Crime Prevention  Volume:22  Issue:3  Dated:(1983)  Pages:148-167
Author(s): N Morgan
Date Published: 1983
Page Count: 20
Format: Article
Language: English
Country: United Kingdom
Annotation: This paper discusses contemporary developments in penal policy and practice in the light of Professor Stanley Cohen's 'Punitive City' concept.
Abstract: It is shown that there is little evidence of a 'transformation' in either ideology or practice away from custodial modes of control. Short custodial sentences have much support and, as Cohen suggested, supposed 'alternatives' often do not displace custody. For the foreseeable future it is likely that non-custodial controls will be relatively cost-effective, rather simple and overtly punitive or reparative in aim: it is highly improbable that they will as Professor Cohen suggests, be oriented towards a 'social-work' rationale of 'treatment'. (Author abstract)
Index Term(s): Alternatives to institutionalization; England; Sentencing/Sanctions; Wales
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http://www.ncjrs.gov/App/publications/abstract.aspx?ID=92484

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