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NCJ Number: 97155 Find in a Library
Title: Perceptions of Safety - A Comparison of Foot Patrol Versus Motor Patrol Officers
Author(s): R C Trojanowicz; D W Banas
Corporate Author: National Neighborhood Foot Patrol Ctr
Michigan State University
School of Criminal Justice
United States of America
Date Published: 1985
Page Count: 31
Sponsoring Agency: Charles Stewart Mott Foundation
Flint, MI 48502
National Institute of Justice/
Rockville, MD 20849
National Neighborhood Foot Patrol Ctr
East Lansing, MI 48824
NCJRS Photocopy Services
Rockville, MD 20849-6000
Sale Source: National Institute of Justice/
NCJRS paper reproduction
Box 6000, Dept F
Rockville, MD 20849
United States of America

NCJRS Photocopy Services
Box 6000
Rockville, MD 20849-6000
United States of America

National Neighborhood Foot Patrol Ctr
Michigan State University
School of Criminal Justice
560 Baker Hall
East Lansing, MI 48824
United States of America
Document: PDF
Language: English
Country: United States of America
Annotation: Data were collected during Flint, Michigan's Neighborhood Foot Patrol Program experiment and 1 year after foot patrol had become a citywide effort, so as to compare foot and motor patrol officers' perceptions of their safety. The study aimed to determine if a particular form of policing can help diffuse fear in law enforcement.
Abstract: All 22 foot patrol officers were interviewed, as were 47 randomly selected motorized officers, during January/February 1980, 1 year after the experiment began. The 1984 followup study was based upon interviews with all 64 foot patrol officers and 50 randomly selected motorized officers. In 1984, officers were asked the same five questions pertaining to safety issues and two additional questions. Officers' responses were ranked on a Likert-type scale. T-tests were used to compare responses. In 1980, foot patrol officers felt significantly safer in the conduct of their work than motorized officers. They cited familiarity with their beat neighborhoods and residents as being responsible for their sense of security. In 1984 also, foot patrol officers felt significantly safer than motorized officers for the same reason. Foot patrol officers had a significantly stronger feeling that citizens overestimated dangers in their community. Foot patrol officers were also more confident that citizens would help them if they were in trouble, believed more than motorized officers that their patrol areas were safer than the rest of Flint, and conducted fewer pat-downs. Foot patrol officers perceived themselves to be safer on their patrols than motorized officers regardless of age, race, gender, prior police experience, or military service. Tabular data and 17 footnotes are provided.
Index Term(s): Comparative analysis; Foot patrol; Idaho; Motor patrol; Occupational safety and health; Police occupational stress; Police work attitudes
To cite this abstract, use the following link:
http://www.ncjrs.gov/App/publications/abstract.aspx?ID=97155

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