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NCJ Number: 97161 Add to Shopping cart Find in a Library
Title: Prospects for Justice Model Probation (From Probation and Justice, P 101-135, 1984, Patrick D McAnany et al, ed. - See NCJ-97157)
Author(s): D Thomson
Date Published: 1984
Page Count: 35
Sponsoring Agency: National Institute of Justice/
Rockville, MD 20849
NCJRS Photocopy Services
Rockville, MD 20849-6000
Oelgeschlager, Gunn and Hain Publishers, Inc
Boston, MA 02116
Sale Source: National Institute of Justice/
NCJRS paper reproduction
Box 6000, Dept F
Rockville, MD 20849
United States of America

Oelgeschlager, Gunn and Hain Publishers, Inc
131 Clarendon Street
Boston, MA 02116
United States of America

NCJRS Photocopy Services
Box 6000
Rockville, MD 20849-6000
United States of America
Language: English
Country: United States of America
Annotation: If the justice model were applied to probation, changes would be required in probation's organization and practice.
Abstract: The justice model is retrospective in focusing on present criminality and is proportional in matching sanctions to the crimes committed. The goal is to correct the harms done by offenders rather than to correct offenders themselves. A justice model for probation would make little sense unless the model were more widely applied in the criminal justice system. Probation can fit well with other elements of the system, however, when the system's goals are justice and retribution. In a justice model, probation is likely to be viewed as a public service occupation rather than as a human services occupation. However, probation operations would vary to reflect the needs, capabilities, and experiences of local communities. The probation officer's role would be demanding and frustrating, due to the need to mediate the divergent interests of the victim, the offender, and the public. However, it could also be an extremely important and rewarding one. Offender services would be voluntary. One data set collected in 1979 indicates that probation officers may be receptive to reforming probation according to the justice model. However, many questions and obstacles remain. Data tables, notes, and a list of 104 references are supplied.
Index Term(s): Correctional reform; Just deserts theory; Probation
Note: Available on microfiche as NCJ-97157.
To cite this abstract, use the following link:
http://www.ncjrs.gov/App/publications/abstract.aspx?ID=97161

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