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NCJ Number: 97162 Add to Shopping cart Find in a Library
Title: Punishment and Responsibility in Juvenile Court - Desert-Based Probation for Delinquents (From Probation and Justice, P 137-172, 1984, Patrick D McAnany et al, ed. - See NCJ-97157)
Author(s): D Thompson; P D McAnany
Date Published: 1984
Page Count: 36
Sponsoring Agency: National Institute of Justice/
Rockville, MD 20849
NCJRS Photocopy Services
Rockville, MD 20849-6000
Oelgeschlager, Gunn and Hain Publishers, Inc
Boston, MA 02116
Sale Source: National Institute of Justice/
NCJRS paper reproduction
Box 6000, Dept F
Rockville, MD 20849
United States of America

Oelgeschlager, Gunn and Hain Publishers, Inc
131 Clarendon Street
Boston, MA 02116
United States of America

NCJRS Photocopy Services
Box 6000
Rockville, MD 20849-6000
United States of America
Language: English
Country: United States of America
Annotation: If the juvenile court functioned as an advocate for youth in relation to other community agencies, it could adopt a role which would be consistent with both the assumptions underlying the justice model and the need to seek social justice.
Abstract: The juvenile court is moving toward a model more nearly reflecting the goals of adult courts, while still retaining certain unique features. Just desert has become the major norm for adult sentencing during the past decade, and the juvenile court has been assimilating the due process requirements of adult courts. Although the juvenile court may not come to be based on the retributive model, such a court would not seriously contradict the values of the juvenile court as it currently operates. The four elements of this justice model are wrongdoing, the responsibility of the individual for his/her behavior, the establishment of blame, and the use of punishment by the court. In such a model, the intake, investigation, and supervision functions of juvenile probation work would be characterized by the limiting, controlling, and monitoring of discretion. However, the juvenile court's larger mandate is also crucial, because the protection-of-youth role is also important. In this broader context, probation officers would seek out systemic and organizational situations which are directly or indirectly harmful to entire groups of children. The court would serve as the last-resort advocate on behalf of children, so they can obtain the resources to which they are entitled. Data tables and a list of 72 references are supplied.
Index Term(s): Just deserts theory; Juvenile justice system; Juvenile probation; Juvenile sentencing
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