skip navigation

PUBLICATIONS

Register for Latest Research

Stay Informed
Register with NCJRS to receive NCJRS's biweekly e-newsletter JUSTINFO and additional periodic emails from NCJRS and the NCJRS federal sponsors that highlight the latest research published or sponsored by the Office of Justice Programs.

NCJRS Abstract

The document referenced below is part of the NCJRS Virtual Library collection. To conduct further searches of the collection, visit the Virtual Library. See the Obtain Documents page for direction on how to access resources online, via mail, through interlibrary loans, or in a local library.

 

NCJ Number: 97168 Add to Shopping cart Find in a Library
Title: Probation in the 1980s - A Public Administration Viewpoint (From Probation and Justice, P 327-346, 1984, Patrick D McAnany et al, ed. - See NCJ-97157)
Author(s): R C Cushman
Date Published: 1984
Page Count: 20
Sponsoring Agency: National Institute of Justice/
Rockville, MD 20849
NCJRS Photocopy Services
Rockville, MD 20849-6000
Oelgeschlager, Gunn and Hain Publishers, Inc
Boston, MA 02116
Sale Source: National Institute of Justice/
NCJRS paper reproduction
Box 6000, Dept F
Rockville, MD 20849
United States of America

Oelgeschlager, Gunn and Hain Publishers, Inc
131 Clarendon Street
Boston, MA 02116
United States of America

NCJRS Photocopy Services
Box 6000
Rockville, MD 20849-6000
United States of America
Type: Report (Study/Research)
Language: English
Country: United States of America
Annotation: Probation needs to improve its image, strengthen its fiscal support, and revise the organization of its services.
Abstract: Despite their importance, probation departments have become the least visible and most vulnerable parts of the correctional system. This is because of the comparative newness of probation, the image of probation officers as lenient, the lack of an effective constituency, the lack of advocacy, and vulnerability to fiscal constraints. Other problems are jurisdictional fragmentation, the lack of professional identity for probation workers, and the lack of eminent leaders in the probation profession. Growing crime rates, confusion about the roles of judges and correctional professionals, and lack of definitive research have all made it difficult for probation to realize its full potential. A reappraisal of probation's goals is clearly needed as the first step in change. A clear mission developed through a thoughtful, participative process is needed, as are major probation strategies that lead to action based on evaluative research. In addition, probation professionals should be required to meet and maintain specific personal and professional standards that are known and supported by the public and probation clients. To improve the image of probation, probation's leaders must seek support from former probationers, labor unions, minority groups, families, defense attorneys, employers, and members of helping professions. Fiscal support must be reexamined and improved, with some support and control from the States. Efforts are also needed to improve the organization of probation service, with leadership from a strong professional organization and the establishment of a strong Federal advocate and source of technical assistance. Each State should have a relatively independent board or office to administer any subsidies to local correctional services. The line of authority should run to the governor, and the office should be regulatory rather than operational. Three references are listed.
Index Term(s): Correctional planning; Correctional reform; Organization development; Organization studies; Probation
Note: Available on microfiche as NCJ-97157.
To cite this abstract, use the following link:
http://www.ncjrs.gov/App/publications/abstract.aspx?ID=97168

*A link to the full-text document is provided whenever possible. For documents not available online, a link to the publisher's website is provided. Tell us how you use the NCJRS Library and Abstracts Database - send us your feedback.