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NCJ Number: 97169 Add to Shopping cart Find in a Library
Title: Community Context of Probation (From Probation and Justice, P 347-368, 1984, Patrick D McAnany et al, ed. - See NCJ-97157)
Author(s): D E Duffee
Date Published: 1984
Page Count: 22
Sponsoring Agency: National Institute of Justice/
Rockville, MD 20849
NCJRS Photocopy Services
Rockville, MD 20849-6000
Oelgeschlager, Gunn and Hain Publishers, Inc
Boston, MA 02116
Sale Source: National Institute of Justice/
NCJRS paper reproduction
Box 6000, Dept F
Rockville, MD 20849
United States of America

Oelgeschlager, Gunn and Hain Publishers, Inc
131 Clarendon Street
Boston, MA 02116
United States of America

NCJRS Photocopy Services
Box 6000
Rockville, MD 20849-6000
United States of America
Language: English
Country: United States of America
Annotation: Although many changes in probation practice can be made without regard for the nature of the community in which probation operates, the external environment exercises constraints that must be accommodated in all activities, from policymaking to daily supervision.
Abstract: Roland Warren has defined community in terms of the arrangements of the following functions: production, distribution, and consumption; socialization; social control; social participation; and mutual support. Warren also suggests four separate dimensions upon which communities may differ: local autonomy, correspondence or divergence in local services or functional delivery areas, strength of psychological identification with the local area, and strength of horizontal articulation or integration across functional units. Autonomy and horizontal articulation are the most crucial dimensions in considering a community's effects on probation. Using these dimensions, four types of communities can be defined: disorganized communities, solidary communities, fragmented communities, and interdependent communities. The four types of probation likely to correspond to these types of community structure are discussed. The two main contributions of community theory to the formulation of a probation mission are the recognition that probation is not and will not be the same everywhere and the recognition that some changes in probation, even if internally generated, will have external effects. Thirty-eight references are supplied.
Index Term(s): Change management; Community relations; Community resources; Correctional reform; Probation
Note: Available on microfiche as NCJ-97157.
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http://www.ncjrs.gov/App/publications/abstract.aspx?ID=97169

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