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NCJ Number: 97171 Add to Shopping cart Find in a Library
Title: Federal Role in Probation Reform (From Probation and Justice, P 387-409, 1984, Patrick D McAnany et al, ed. - See NCJ-97157)
Author(s): T L Fitzharris
Date Published: 1984
Page Count: 23
Sponsoring Agency: National Institute of Justice/
Rockville, MD 20849
NCJRS Photocopy Services
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Oelgeschlager, Gunn and Hain Publishers, Inc
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Sale Source: National Institute of Justice/
NCJRS paper reproduction
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Oelgeschlager, Gunn and Hain Publishers, Inc
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NCJRS Photocopy Services
Box 6000
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United States of America
Language: English
Country: United States of America
Annotation: The National Institute of Corrections (NIC) provides the best hope for developing the needed leadership and advocacy for probation reform nationwide.
Abstract: Probation is currently unclear about its mission, which is demonstrated in overstated, unspecified, and unmeasurable objectives; undemonstrated expertise and inadequate standards and training; and unsubstantiated results. Other problems are its history of inadequate funding, its isolation from the public, its lack of strategic planning and effective management techniques, and its weak constituency. However, no national response has countered the critics of probation. For just this purpose, however, NIC was established. Its purpose is to centralize and focus corrections reform efforts nationwide. A wide range of Federal and nonfederal bodies have agreed on the need and purpose of NIC. Because of its size, organizational structure, and congressionally mandated advisory requirement, NIC is in an excellent position to assume a strong but flexible leadership role in probation. Recent efforts to begin developing a national focal point for probation and a national corrections policy exemplify the potential of NIC for assuming a flexible leadership role. A list of activities which NIC might pursue in its leadership role and a list of 76 references are supplied.
Index Term(s): Correctional reform; Federal programs; National Institute of Corrections (NIC); Probation
Note: Available on microfiche as NCJ-97157.
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http://www.ncjrs.gov/App/publications/abstract.aspx?ID=97171

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