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NCJRS Abstract

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NCJ Number: 97256 Add to Shopping cart Find in a Library
Title: Hypnotically Refreshed Testimony - Enhanced Memory or Tampering With Evidence?
Author(s): M T Orne; D a Soskis; D F Dinges; E C Orne; M H Tonry
Corporate Author: Abt Associates, Inc
United States of America
Date Published: 1985
Page Count: 70
Sponsoring Agency: Abt Associates, Inc
Cambridge, MA 02138
National Institute of Justice (NIJ)
Washington, DC 20531
National Institute of Justice/
Rockville, MD 20849
NCJRS Photocopy Services
Rockville, MD 20849-6000
Superintendent of Documents, GPO
Washington, DC 20402
US Dept of Justice NIJ Pub
Washington, DC 20531
Contract Number: J-LEAA-013-78
Sale Source: Superintendent of Documents, GPO
Washington, DC 20402
United States of America

National Institute of Justice/
NCJRS paper reproduction
Box 6000, Dept F
Rockville, MD 20849
United States of America

NCJRS Photocopy Services
Box 6000
Rockville, MD 20849-6000
United States of America
Document: PDF
Language: English
Country: United States of America
Annotation: After reviewing scientific knowledge relevant to forensic applications of hypnosis, this report examines the effects of hypnosis on memory, belief, and certitude; the forensic use of hypnosis; and case law on the admissibility of hypnotically refreshed testimony. Guidelines are presented for the investigative use of hypnosis, the area to which the report believes the forensic use of hypnosis should be limited.
Abstract: An introduction to hypnosis notes that hypnotized persons are highly suggestible and often invent requested information that memory cannot supply. The discussion also indicates that it is possible both to lie under hypnosis and to feign the hypnotic state. The most technical part of the report reviews scientific evidence relevant to the forensic applications of hypnosis. Critical issues raised by forensic hypnosis are then considered, including ways in which it might be used, who should conduct the hypnotic interview, and what induction and questioning techniques should be used. Consideration of modern case law on the admissibility of hypnotically refreshed eyewitness testimony indicates that the courts agree that such testimony should not be admissible. The report argues for the use of hypnosis only in investigations; guidelines for such use are presented to cover the qualifications and knowledge of the hypnotist, videotape recordings of hypnosis sessions, limitations on those present during the interview, prehypnosis evaluation, appropriate hypnotic induction and memory retrieval techniques, communication with the hypnotist, posthypnosis discussion, clinical followup, technical considerations, and precautions in hypnotizing suspects. Sixteen footnotes, 89 references, and a glossary are provided.
Index Term(s): Investigative techniques; Judicial decisions; Questioning under hypnosis
Note: national Institute of Justice/Issues and Practices in Criminal Justice.
To cite this abstract, use the following link:
http://www.ncjrs.gov/App/publications/abstract.aspx?ID=97256

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