skip navigation

PUBLICATIONS

Register for Latest Research

Stay Informed
Register with NCJRS to receive NCJRS's biweekly e-newsletter JUSTINFO and additional periodic emails from NCJRS and the NCJRS federal sponsors that highlight the latest research published or sponsored by the Office of Justice Programs.

NCJRS Abstract

The document referenced below is part of the NCJRS Virtual Library collection. To conduct further searches of the collection, visit the Virtual Library. See the Obtain Documents page for direction on how to access resources online, via mail, through interlibrary loans, or in a local library.

 

NCJ Number: 97682 Add to Shopping cart Find in a Library
Title: Strategies for Supplementing the Police Budget
Author(s): L D Stellwagen; K A Wylie
Corporate Author: Abt Associates, Inc
United States of America
Date Published: 1985
Page Count: 87
Sponsoring Agency: Abt Associates, Inc
Cambridge, MA 02138
National Institute of Justice (NIJ)
Washington, DC 20531
National Institute of Justice/
Rockville, MD 20849
NCJRS Photocopy Services
Rockville, MD 20849-6000
Superintendent of Documents, GPO
Washington, DC 20402
US Dept of Justice NIJ Pub
Washington, DC 20531
Contract Number: J-LEAA-011-81
Sale Source: Superintendent of Documents, GPO
Washington, DC 20402
United States of America

National Institute of Justice/
NCJRS paper reproduction
Box 6000, Dept F
Rockville, MD 20849
United States of America

NCJRS Photocopy Services
Box 6000
Rockville, MD 20849-6000
United States of America
Dataset: DATASET 1
Language: English
Country: United States of America
Annotation: Donation programs, forfeiture programs, and other strategies are examined by which law enforcement agencies supplement their budgets.
Abstract: Study data came from a review of the laws and literature and interviews with more than 100 law enforcement administrators, local budget directors, State criminal justice officials, and private citizens. Donation programs were often initiated to fulfill special needs, such as equipping the patrol force with body armor or supporting a mounted unit. A few cities have set up formal foundations to provide a regular source of contributions. In recent years, police and prosecutors have also increased their use of forfeiture from smuggling and organized crime operations to supplement their budgets. Other strategies include using volunteers to help officers perform their duties, conducting fundraising events, earmarking part of traffic fines for police services, passing special police taxes, and seeking rewards from the Internal Revenue Service for tipping them off about tax evaders in racketeering cases. However, charging user fees directly for police services was only of indirect benefit because they may hurt those who most need the services and the money may go to the jurisdictions' general fund rather than to the police. Critics of the supplementation strategies have raised a variety of issues. In response, State laws and program organizers have tried to establish safeguards against possible abuses. Footnotes, data tables, and an appendix presenting a State-by-State comparison of forfeiture laws for controlled substances violations and other background information are included. (Author summary modified)
Index Term(s): Budgets; Funding sources; Police fund raising
Note: National Institute of Justice Issues and Practices in Criminal Justice.
To cite this abstract, use the following link:
http://www.ncjrs.gov/App/publications/abstract.aspx?ID=97682

*A link to the full-text document is provided whenever possible. For documents not available online, a link to the publisher's website is provided. Tell us how you use the NCJRS Library and Abstracts Database - send us your feedback.