skip navigation

PUBLICATIONS

Register for Latest Research

Stay Informed
Register with NCJRS to receive NCJRS's biweekly e-newsletter JUSTINFO and additional periodic emails from NCJRS and the NCJRS federal sponsors that highlight the latest research published or sponsored by the Office of Justice Programs.

NCJRS Abstract

The document referenced below is part of the NCJRS Virtual Library collection. To conduct further searches of the collection, visit the Virtual Library. See the Obtain Documents page for direction on how to access resources online, via mail, through interlibrary loans, or in a local library.

 

NCJ Number: 97851 Add to Shopping cart Find in a Library
Title: Joint Trial Calendars in the Western District of Missouri
Author(s): D Stienstra
Corporate Author: Federal Judicial Ctr
United States of America
Date Published: 1985
Page Count: 56
Sponsoring Agency: Federal Judicial Ctr
Washington, DC 20002
National Institute of Justice/
Rockville, MD 20849
NCJRS Photocopy Services
Rockville, MD 20849-6000
Sale Source: Federal Judicial Ctr
Thurgood Marshall Federal Judiciary Building
One Columbus Circle, NE
Washington, DC 20002
United States of America

National Institute of Justice/
NCJRS paper reproduction
Box 6000, Dept F
Rockville, MD 20849
United States of America

NCJRS Photocopy Services
Box 6000
Rockville, MD 20849-6000
United States of America
Document: PDF
Language: English
Country: United States of America
Annotation: This report describes the joint trial calendar system developed by the U.S. District Court for the Western District of Missouri whereby all judges share one trial calendar for those cases that have developed to the point of trial and are not particularly complex or likely to be protracted.
Abstract: A case is placed on the joint calendar only after the judge has decided that it is ready for trial. The criminal joint calendar is used for all but the most complicated cases and the civil calendar is used for jury cases that can be tried in 4 days or less. The process begins when the judges list their trial ready cases. During a designated 2- to 3-week period, they suspend all other activities and try all the cases on the calendar, starting with ones assigned to them and then moving through whatever comes up next. This guarantees a trial and creates some uncertainty about the identity of the trial judge which is thought to encourage settlement since some attorneys prefer not to go before an unknown judge. The report traces the 15-year history of the joint calendar and then gives step-by-step descriptions of the civil and criminal calendar procedures. This discussion notes types of cases for which the calendars are used, offices involved in the procedures, and the effect of the calendars on court operations. Critical elements of a joint trial calendar are listed, as are questions that courts should answer before considering adopting the system. The report was based on personal interviews with judges and other court staff conducted in December 1983 and August 1984 and telephone interviews with attorneys who practice regularly in the Western District. Orders and forms used by the court are included. There are 11 footnotes.
Index Term(s): Court case flow management; District Courts; Missouri
Note: Innovations in the Courts - A Series on Court Administration.
To cite this abstract, use the following link:
http://www.ncjrs.gov/App/publications/abstract.aspx?ID=97851

*A link to the full-text document is provided whenever possible. For documents not available online, a link to the publisher's website is provided. Tell us how you use the NCJRS Library and Abstracts Database - send us your feedback.