skip navigation

PUBLICATIONS

Register for Latest Research

Stay Informed
Register with NCJRS to receive NCJRS's biweekly e-newsletter JUSTINFO and additional periodic emails from NCJRS and the NCJRS federal sponsors that highlight the latest research published or sponsored by the Office of Justice Programs.

NCJRS Abstract

The document referenced below is part of the NCJRS Virtual Library collection. To conduct further searches of the collection, visit the Virtual Library. See the Obtain Documents page for direction on how to access resources online, via mail, through interlibrary loans, or in a local library.

 

NCJ Number: 97882 Add to Shopping cart Find in a Library
Title: High-Speed Chases - In Pursuit of a Balanced Policy (From Police Management Today, P 99-106, 1985, James J Fyfe, ed. - See NCJ-97876)
Author(s): E Beckman
Date Published: 1985
Page Count: 8
Sponsoring Agency: International City/County Management Assoc
Washington, DC 20002
National Institute of Justice/
Rockville, MD 20849
NCJRS Photocopy Services
Rockville, MD 20849-6000
Sale Source: International City/County Management Assoc
777 North Capitol Street, NE
Washington, DC 20002
United States of America

National Institute of Justice/
NCJRS paper reproduction
Box 6000, Dept F
Rockville, MD 20849
United States of America

NCJRS Photocopy Services
Box 6000
Rockville, MD 20849-6000
United States of America
Language: English
Country: United States of America
Annotation: This article critically examines existing research on accidents caused by high-speed police chases and discusses features of an effective departmental pursuit policy.
Abstract: Although citizens, police administrators, city managers, and legal advisers have become concerned about high-speed police chases, there is little research available and existing research is of questionable quality. A 1970 Department of Transportation study was based on a 1-month field study of four police agencies, while another project by the Physicians for Automotive Safety failed to specify its sample size and response rate. Even in the absence of good research, the police community acknowledges that pursuits are synomous with hazard. A reasonable position is that not even the attempt to capture a serious offender is worth the death of an innocent bystander. Each State legislature has the duty to address the life and death issue of pursuits. In the absence of such laws, a police chief must establish detailed and carefully formulated policy. Assuming that law and policy will allow some type of pursuit, training is a necessity. Control through supervision and discipline must follow. Excellent pursuit policies have been developed by the Los Angeles Sheriff's Department (California), the Anaheim Police Department (California), and the Southfield Police Department (Michigan). Good policies are carefully written, cover many associated issues, urge consideration of the offense balanced against the danger of the pursuit, and provide guidelines for discontinuance of the pursuit. Specific issues considered include when to initiate pursuit, number of units permitted, helicopter assistance, driving tactics, communications, capture, firearms use, blocking and roadblocks, absolute speed limits, and reporting and postpursuit analysis. It would be helpful to future policy formulation if police administrators maintained statistical records on all their pursuits. The article includes 23 footnotes.
Index Term(s): Police policies and procedures; Police pursuit driving; Police vehicular accidents
Note: *This document is currently unavailable from NCJRS. Reproduced from The Police Chief, (January 1983).
To cite this abstract, use the following link:
http://www.ncjrs.gov/App/publications/abstract.aspx?ID=97882

*A link to the full-text document is provided whenever possible. For documents not available online, a link to the publisher's website is provided. Tell us how you use the NCJRS Library and Abstracts Database - send us your feedback.