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NCJ Number: 98112 Add to Shopping cart Find in a Library
Title: Precast and Prestressed Concrete for Justice Facilities
Corporate Author: Prestressed Concrete Institute
United States of America
Date Published: 1985
Page Count: 58
Sponsoring Agency: National Institute of Justice/
Rockville, MD 20849
NCJRS Photocopy Services
Rockville, MD 20849-6000
Prestressed Concrete Institute
Chicago, IL 60606
Sale Source: National Institute of Justice/
NCJRS paper reproduction
Box 6000, Dept F
Rockville, MD 20849
United States of America

NCJRS Photocopy Services
Box 6000
Rockville, MD 20849-6000
United States of America

Prestressed Concrete Institute
201 North Wells Street
Chicago, IL 60606
United States of America
Document: PDF
Language: English
Country: United States of America
Annotation: This booklet explains the applications and advantages of precast and prestressed concrete for designing and constructing correctional facilities and presents diagrams and 14 case studies illustrating the use of this building material.
Abstract: The booklet, prepared for the Prestressed Concrete Institute Justice Facilities Committee, describes precast concrete as an economical, speedy building process, rather than just a material that can be modeled into a variety of shapes. Elaborations on planning and design considerations, components and structural systems, connections and joinery, mechanical and electrical subsystems, and security hardware are presented from a technical as well as a safety and security perspective. The 14 case studies describe detention centers, minimum-, medium- and maximum-security prisons, a police station, and a forensic facility. Each describes the project and presents photographs, floor plans, project costs, and information on the architect, structural engineer, general contractors, and owner. A bibliography lists 12 sources.
Index Term(s): Architectural design; Construction costs; Correctional facilities; Prison construction
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http://www.ncjrs.gov/App/publications/abstract.aspx?ID=98112

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