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NCJRS Abstract

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NCJ Number: 98212 Find in a Library
Title: Juveniles in Adult Jails and Lockups - Its Your Move
Corporate Author: University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign
Community Research Forum
United States of America
Date Published: 1985
Page Count: 48
Sponsoring Agency: National Institute of Justice/
Rockville, MD 20849
NCJRS Photocopy Services
Rockville, MD 20849-6000
Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention
Washington, DC 20531
University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign
Champaign, IL 61820
Contract Number: J-LEAA-012-81
Sale Source: National Institute of Justice/
NCJRS paper reproduction
Box 6000, Dept F
Rockville, MD 20849
United States of America

University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign
Community Research Forum
505 East Green Street
Suite 210
Champaign, IL 61820
United States of America

NCJRS Photocopy Services
Box 6000
Rockville, MD 20849-6000
United States of America
Document: PDF
Language: English
Country: United States of America
Annotation: A report on juveniles locked in adult jails focuses on effects, conditions, and prevention programs.
Abstract: Each year approximately 479,000 juveniles are locked in adult jails throughout the United States; about 10 percent of these are held for serious offenses. The most serious effects of jailing juveniles in adult facilities are the physical and sexual abuse of juveniles by adult inmates. Psychological effects are related to influence created by the setting, verbal abuse, the negative self-image created by the setting, and criminal label which pursues the youth following his or her release. The Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention Act focuses on the separation of all juveniles from adults and the requirement that status offenders be removed from juvenile detention and corresponding correctional facilities. In a national survey of public attitudes toward youth crime nationwide, findings reveal that the majority of respondents agreed that the main purpose of the juvenile court system should be to treat and rehabilitate rather than punish. Alternatives to jailing need to be explored which focus on home detention, attention homes, and small group homes. Studies on alternative programs reveal that upwards of 90 percent of juveniles in these programs neither committed new offenses nor ran away. It is recommended that juvenile detention centers should be used as a last resort for the small percentage of juveniles who pose a significant threat to the public safety or court process. A total of 90 references are listed.
Index Term(s): Correctional facilities; Juvenile delinquency prevention; Juvenile offenders; Juvenile rehabilitation; Juveniles in adult facilities
To cite this abstract, use the following link:
http://www.ncjrs.gov/App/publications/abstract.aspx?ID=98212

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