skip navigation

PUBLICATIONS

Register for Latest Research

Stay Informed
Register with NCJRS to receive NCJRS's biweekly e-newsletter JUSTINFO and additional periodic emails from NCJRS and the NCJRS federal sponsors that highlight the latest research published or sponsored by the Office of Justice Programs.

NCJRS Abstract

The document referenced below is part of the NCJRS Virtual Library collection. To conduct further searches of the collection, visit the Virtual Library. See the Obtain Documents page for direction on how to access resources online, via mail, through interlibrary loans, or in a local library.

 

NCJ Number: 98501 Add to Shopping cart Find in a Library
Title: First Decade of the Circuit Court Executive - An Evaluation
Author(s): J W Macy
Corporate Author: Federal Judicial Ctr
United States of America
Date Published: 1985
Page Count: 88
Sponsoring Agency: Federal Judicial Ctr
Washington, DC 20002
National Institute of Justice/
Rockville, MD 20849
NCJRS Photocopy Services
Rockville, MD 20849-6000
Publication Number: FJC-R-85-4
Sale Source: Federal Judicial Ctr
Thurgood Marshall Federal Judiciary Building
One Columbus Circle, NE
Washington, DC 20002
United States of America

National Institute of Justice/
NCJRS paper reproduction
Box 6000, Dept F
Rockville, MD 20849
United States of America

NCJRS Photocopy Services
Box 6000
Rockville, MD 20849-6000
United States of America
Document: PDF
Type: Program/Project Evaluation
Language: English
Country: United States of America
Annotation: In the 10 years since the position was created in the Federal courts, circuit executives have relieved the chief judges of many administrative matters, but they have failed to realize their potential for significantly improving the courts' performance.
Abstract: This conclusion is based on the author's observations as a member of the Certification Board for circuit executives, interviews with court officials, and reports provided by nine circuit executives. A 1978 evaluation found that circuit executives were so burdened with routine responsibilities that they had little time for other tasks and that they were not treated as professionals equal to judges. In the intervening 5 years, expanded workloads and mounting concern about judicial processes added new legitimacy to the circuit executives and their functions. The 1982 evaluation, however, found that executives were still overburdened with routine clerical work for the judicial council and its committees. It also discovered that preparation and guidance for the circuit judicial conference had become a major activity and detracted from more significant assignments relating to improved judicial performance. Progress was identified in relieving the chief judge of administrative matters, although these judges still spent considerable time on administration. Responsibilities assumed by the circuit executive included budgeting, personnel and training, security, and liaison between the administrative office and the Federal Judicial Center. Acquisition and planning for necessary space, equipment, and furnishings were still left to the chief judge. While circuit executives had been accepted by chief judges and the judicial councils, they had not attained the partnership relationship with the chief judge that is necessary for constructive change. The selection process has been largely successful, although too time-consuming and too dependent on unsolicited applications. The evaluation discusses the Board of Certifications's role and presents recommendations. Tables concerning applicants and appointments are supplied.
Index Term(s): Court administrators; Court reorganization; Federal courts; Program evaluation
To cite this abstract, use the following link:
http://www.ncjrs.gov/App/publications/abstract.aspx?ID=98501

*A link to the full-text document is provided whenever possible. For documents not available online, a link to the publisher's website is provided. Tell us how you use the NCJRS Library and Abstracts Database - send us your feedback.