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NCJRS Abstract

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NCJ Number: 99217 Find in a Library
Title: Uniform Crime Reporting and Community Policing - An Historical Perspective
Author(s): D W Banas; R C Trojanowicz
Corporate Author: National Neighborhood Foot Patrol Ctr
Michigan State University
School of Criminal Justice
United States of America
Date Published: 1985
Page Count: 29
Sponsoring Agency: Charles Stewart Mott Foundation
Flint, MI 48502
National Institute of Justice/
Rockville, MD 20849
National Neighborhood Foot Patrol Ctr
East Lansing, MI 48824
NCJRS Photocopy Services
Rockville, MD 20849-6000
Sale Source: National Institute of Justice/
NCJRS paper reproduction
Box 6000, Dept F
Rockville, MD 20849
United States of America

NCJRS Photocopy Services
Box 6000
Rockville, MD 20849-6000
United States of America

National Neighborhood Foot Patrol Ctr
Michigan State University
School of Criminal Justice
560 Baker Hall
East Lansing, MI 48824
United States of America
Document: PDF
Type: Historical Overview
Language: English
Country: United States of America
Annotation: After discussing the historical purposes and origins of the Uniform Crime Reports (UCR's), this study examines the relationship of UCR's to innovative community policing modes, with the Flint Neighborhood Foot Patrol experiment being the focus of the discussion.
Abstract: In reviewing the historical background of the UCR's, the study concludes that what they actually measure is not as relevant as the police organizational needs which prompted their creation and sustained their use over 50 years. Historically, the UCR's facilitated the centralization of police discretion within a command structure. UCR's became the basis for organizational judgments and the measurement of line-officer performance. The UCR's and associated measures dictated forms of structural change and technological innovation based on ideological considerations rooted in quantitative measurements. Basing police performance on UCR quantitative crime reporting measures necessarily fosters reactive rather than proactive policing. This encourages police to focus on the symptoms rather than the causes of social disorder. The Flint Foot Patrol experiment (Michigan), for example had proactive policing goals that could not be measured by UCR statistics. The UCR's, although useful as one indicator of community trends, are not a measure of the quality of life that can be fostered by community policing. Sixty-one notes and a 42-item selected bibliography are provided.
Index Term(s): Foot patrol; Michigan; Police effectiveness; Uniform Crime Reporting (UCR) Program
Note: Community Policing Series number 5.
To cite this abstract, use the following link:
http://www.ncjrs.gov/App/publications/abstract.aspx?ID=99217

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