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NCJ Number: NCJ 224028   Add to Shopping cart   Find in a Library
Title: Gender, Mental Illness, and Crime
Author(s): Melissa Thompson
Date Published: 09/2008
Page Count: 70
Sponsoring Agency: National Institute of Justice
US Department of Justice
Office of Justice Programs
United States of America
Grant Number: 2007-IJ-CX-0004
Sale Source: National Institute of Justice/NCJRS
Box 6000
Rockville, MD 20849
United States of America
Document: PDF 
Dataset: DATASET 1
Type: Report (Study/Research)
Language: English
Country: United States of America
Annotation: This report presents the methodology and findings of a study of the gendered effects of depression, drug use, and treatment on crime and the effects of interaction with the criminal justice system on subsequent depression and drug use.
Abstract: The study found that being depressed and using illegal substances significantly increased criminal behavior for both men and women, although both factors were especially problematic for women. The study also found that treatment of substance dependency and/or depression had little impact in reducing crime and might actually have increased crime rates. The exception to this finding involved older respondents, who were less likely to engage in crime after receiving either depression or substance-abuse treatment; these results were similar for both men and women. In addition, the research found that individuals who became involved with the criminal justice system tended to be more depressed and more likely to engage in illegal substance use than individuals who had no criminal justice contacts. Criminal justice contacts were particularly likely to increase men’s depression and women’s illegal drug use. These findings point to the need to be aware of the effects of criminal justice interventions on the mental health of offenders. This suggests the need to focus on reducing the impact of stressors experienced within the criminal justice system. This might include lower bail or shorter sentences and allowing these offenders to return to their families, workplaces, or schools as soon as possible. Future research should use longitudinal data in order to better understand the sequence and timing of the events examined in this study. This study analyzed data obtained in 2004 as part of the National Household Survey on Drug Use and Health (NSDUH), a nationally representative survey of respondents aged 12 years or older. 18 exhibits, 13 references, and 12 notes
Main Term(s): Criminology
Index Term(s): Drug abuse ; Behavior under stress ; Mentally ill offenders ; Stress management ; Male female offender comparisons ; NIJ final report
   
  To cite this abstract, use the following link:
https://www.ncjrs.gov/App/Publications/abstract.aspx?ID=245978

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