skip navigation

CrimeSolutions.gov

Add your conference to our Justice Events calendar

PUBLICATIONS

Register for Latest Research

Stay Informed
Register with NCJRS to receive NCJRS's biweekly e-newsletter JUSTINFO and additional periodic emails from NCJRS and the NCJRS federal sponsors that highlight the latest research published or sponsored by the Office of Justice Programs.

NCJRS Abstract

The document referenced below is part of the NCJRS Library collection. To conduct further searches of the collection, visit the NCJRS Abstracts Database. See the Obtain Documents page for direction on how to access resources online, via mail, through interlibrary loans, or in a local library.

 
  NCJ Number: NCJ 195737     Find in a Library
  Title: Violent Victimization as a Risk Factor for Violent Offending Among Juveniles
  Document URL: HTML PDF 
  Author(s): Jennifer N. Shaffer ; R. Barry Ruback
  Date Published: 12/2002
  Page Count: 12
  Annotation: This bulletin examines victimization and offending experiences in subgroups of juveniles classified by age, gender, race, and level of physical development and identifies risk and protective factors for victimization and offending utilizing information from the National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent Health.
  Abstract: Juveniles have high rates of violent victimization and violent offending, suggesting that some juveniles are both victims and perpetrators of violence. This bulletin analyzes the relationships between violent victimizations and violent offending across a 2-year period, using data for 5,003 juveniles who participated in the National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent Health. The participant sample consisted of juveniles ages 11- to 17-years-old addressing three issues: (1) how were violent victimization and violent offending related over time; (2) what individual-level factors might explain the relationship between victimization and offending; and (3) does drug use affect the relationship between victimization and offending? The study focused on violence among juveniles for three reasons: (1) to concentrate on the most serious offenses since less is known about the violent victimization of juveniles than about the violent victimization of adults; (2) because many fewer juveniles engage in violence than in property offending and in minor deviant acts; and (3) the data source for the analyses included measures of non-violent offending but not nonviolent victimization. The analyses indicates that violent victimization is an important risk factor for subsequent violent offending, repeat offending is more common than repeat victimization, and violent victimization and violent offending share many of the same risk factors. Several policy implications were found in this analysis that included: (1) some groups are at higher risk than others for violent victimization; (2) violent victimization is a warning signal for future violent victimization; (3) violent victimization is a warning signal for future violent offending; and (4) many of the risk factors associated with juvenile violence suggest opportunities for intervention. Recommendations and suggestions for future research are presented and discussed. References and tables
  Main Term(s): Juvenile offenders
  Index Term(s): Violence ; Violent crimes ; Juvenile delinquency factors ; Victimology ; Violent offenders ; Victimization ; Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention (OJJDP) ; Dangerousness ; Offender profiles ; Violent juvenile offenders ; Juvenile statistics ; Juvenile offender statistics ; Child victims ; Victims of violence ; Adolescent victims
  Sponsoring Agency: Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention
US Dept of Justice
United States of America
  Grant Number: 99-JN-FX-K002
  Sale Source: NCJRS Photocopy Services
Box 6000
Rockville, MD 20849-6000
United States of America

Juvenile Justice Clearinghouse/NCJRS
P.O. Box 6000
Rockville, MD 20849
United States of America
  Type: Report (Study/Research)
  Country: United States of America
  Language: English
   
  To cite this abstract, use the following link:
https://www.ncjrs.gov/App/Publications/abstract.aspx?ID=195737

*A link to the full-text document is provided whenever possible. For documents not available online, a link to the publisher's website is provided. Tell us how you use the NCJRS Library and Abstracts Database - send us your feedback.