Special Feature: Campus Safety

image of Campus

Schools and colleges across the country should be safe havens for teaching and learning, free from crime and violence. And for the most part, schools and post-secondary campuses are relatively safe. But victimization does occur, and the risks associated with these crimes vary by context.

Regardless of their age, students who are victims are impacted both physically and emotionally, and their ability to learn can also be negatively affected. Any instance of crime or violence at a school setting not only affects those involved, but it can also disrupt the educational process and the surrounding community.

Sexual assaults on college campuses continue to make national headlines. While official estimates vary, research supported by the National Institute of Justice found that a substantial number of college students are sexually assaulted.

The devastating effects of sexual assault can last a lifetime. In addition to the immediate trauma, sexual assault victims can suffer from long-term mental health effects that include depression, anxiety, and post-traumatic stress disorder.

College and university administrators want their campuses to be safe havens for students. Congress, too, wants students to be safe, and has passed laws to help colleges be safer.

Every year since 2005, colleges and universities across the United States have recognized September as National Campus Safety Awareness Month. To bring awareness to this recognition, NCJRS has compiled publications and related materials that focus on campus crime and safety for practitioners, students, parents, and the public.

Select a page from the "Campus Safety" box to learn more.