In Focus

Reentry

Many incarcerated individuals will be released and will reenter their communities at some point, but may be unprepared for the transition.

Research has shown that reentry support is most important in the first days, weeks, and months immediately following release, when the risk of recidivism is highest. Young people leaving juvenile justice residential placement also face numerous unique concerns. Having a team of people to support them in reentry, including a mentor, is critical.

A holistic approach to offender reentry – one that emphasizes the challenges faced by offenders as they return, and the impact of their return on families, victims, and communities – is critical to addressing public safety.

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Where can I learn more about the reentry of offenders to the community? The Offender Reentry section of the National Institute of Justice (NIJ) website and the Bureau of Justice Assistance...Read More

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Publications and Resources

Integrated Reentry and Employment Strategies: Pilot Project Process Evaluation Report
This report details findings from the implementation of strategies to improve recidivism and job readiness for people returning to their communities from incarceration.
NIJ's Role Under the First Step Act
The First Step Act of 2018 aims to reform the federal prison system and reduce recidivism. Learn about NIJ's role to help implement key features of the statute.
Reentry Starts Here: A Guide for Youth in Long-Term Juvenile Corrections or Treatment Programs
Designed to help youth in juvenile corrections and treatment programs prepare for reentry and success in their community, this guide outlines how transitioning youth can seek assistance from a parent or guardian, mentor, friend, teacher, and other key people.

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