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V. Resources to Implement the Strategy


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Progress on the drug front is not easily achieved without the funding necessary to educate children, reduce violent drug crime, treat citizens in need, protect our borders, and address foreign and domestic sources of supply. To support all these goals for Fiscal Year (FY) 1998, the President requests $16.0 billion to fund drug control efforts. (See Table 5-1.) This request represents an increase of $818 million over the FY 1997 level of $15.2 billion, or a 5.4 percent increase.

Table 5-1. Drug Control Funding: Agency Summary, FY 1996 - FY 1998

FY 1996 Actual

FY 1997 Enacted

FY 1998
President's Request

Agriculture

$28.6

$28.6

$28.5

Corporation for National Service

29.9

30.7

40.3

Defense

822.1

957.5

808.6

Education

588.3

679.0

746.6

Health and Human Services

2,072.5

2,381.5

2,534.1

Housing and Urban Development

293.8

320.0

290.0

Intelligence Community Management Account

-

27.0

27.0

Interior

30.4

30.3

33.2

Federal Judiciary

506.6

539.1

620.5

Justice

6,267.0

6,961.4

7,249.1

Labor

59.4

59.5

65.5

Office of National Drug Control Policy

129.7

288.9

351.2

State

135.3

194.0

215.5

Transportation

372.2

384.3

443.1

Treasury

1,029.0

1,140.8

1,338.1

U.S. Information Agency

8.3

7.6

7.7

Veterans Affairs

1,081.1

1,128.8

1,177.6

Total Drug Control Budget

$13,454.0

$15,158.9

$15,976.8


Supply Reduction

$9,013.2

$10,181.6

$10,502.4

Percentage of Total Drug Budget

67%

67%

66%


Demand Reduction

$4,440.8

$4,977.3

$5,474.4

Percentage of Total Drug Budget

33%

33%

34%


    (Detail may not add to totals due to rounding)


Highlighted FY 1998 Drug Control Initiatives

  • National Media Campaign -- $175 million is requested in FY 1998 for a national media campaign targeting illegal drug consumption by youth. This initiative would rely on high-impact, anti-drug television advertisements aired during prime-time to educate and inform the public about the dangers of illegal drug use.

  • Safe and Drug-Free Schools -- $620 million is requested for FY 1998, an increase of $64 million (11.5 percent) over the FY 1997 appropriation. New resources would provide grant assistance to governors and state educational agencies for drug and violence prevention programs.

  • Community Oriented Policing (COPS) -- $510 million in drug-related resources is requested in FY 1998, an increase of $41 million (9 percent) over FY 1997. COPS serves as the vehicle for the Administration's strategy to fight violent crime and drug use by increasing the number of state and local police officers on the streets.

  • Prevention and Treatment Research -- $522 million is requested in FY 1998 for the National Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA), an increase of $33 million (6 percent) over FY 1997. These additional resources will further NIDA's efforts in conducting basic drug prevention and treatment research.

  • Youth Treatment Initiatives -- $19 million is identified in the FY 1988 HHS budget to support innovative interventions for juvenile offenders which integrate community-wide education, law enforcement, substance abuse treatment, and mental health services; studies of treatment effectiveness for adolescents with co-occurring substance and mental health disorders; and expansion and assessment of comprehensive substance abuse treatment services for adolescents.

  • Youth Prevention Initiatives -- $98 million is identified in the FY 1998 HHS budget for activities designed to prevent marijuana and other drug use among American youth. The initiative will provide State Incentive Grants, raise public awareness and counter pro-drug messages, and expand State level data collection activities.

  • Drug Courts -- $75 million is requested in FY 1998, an increase of $45 million (150 percent) over FY 1997. These grants support state and local criminal justice agencies to provide court-mandated drug treatment and related services to nonviolent offenders.

  • INS Southwest Border Initiative -- $367 million in drug-related resources is requested for the Immigration and Naturalization Service (INS) in FY 1998, an increase of $48 million over FY 1997. This request provides for an additional five hundred Border Patrol agents to stem the flow of illegal drugs and illegal aliens across the southwest border.

  • International Narcotics Control and Support for Peru -- The FY 1998 budget includes $214 million for the State Department's Bureau of International Narcotics and Law Enforcement Affairs (INL). Included in the INL budget is $40 million for Peru, an increase of $17 million over FY 1997. In FY 1998 this program will continue the implementation of the President's directive to place more emphasis on source countries, focus on programs that promote alternative development, dismantle narcotics trafficking organizations, and interdict drugs.

National Funding Priorities for FY 1998-2002

Although outyear funding levels for particular programs still need to be formulated through a cooperative effort with OMB and various agencies, ONDCP has already identified priority areas for funding. ONDCP will continue to emphasize these priorities throughout the five-year drug budget planning horizon. If additional funds for federal drug control programs become available, the Administration will pursue the following priorities:

  • Reducing Youth Drug Use -- The centerpiece of our national counterdrug strategy remains the prevention of drug use by children. Youth-oriented prevention programs today can reduce the number of addicted adults who will cause enormous damage to themselves and our society tomorrow.

  • Reducing the Consequences of Chronic Drug Use -- The national drug control strategy also recognizes that significant reductions in illegal drug consumption cannot occur without addressing the problem of chronic drug use. Chronic drug users comprise about 20 percent of the drug-using population yet consume over two-thirds of the supply of drugs. By reducing the number of dependent drug users, we can lessen the adverse health and welfare consequences of illegal drug use as well as attendant criminal activity.

  • Reducing Drug-related Crime and Violence -- Domestic law enforcement has helped take back our streets from the ravages of the drug trade. Of particular concern is the relationship between drugs and crime. A disproportionate number of more than twelve million property crimes and almost two million violent crimes that occur each year are committed by drug users or traffickers.

  • Stopping the Flow of Drugs at U.S. Borders -- Unless we shield our borders from the flow of illegal drugs, the United States will never stem the tide of drug abuse. Interdiction is the key to stopping drugs from crossing our borders and reaching our neighborhoods.

  • Reducing Domestic and Foreign Sources of Supply -- Interdiction programs alone cannot prevent drugs from flowing into the United States and reaching our children. Therefore, the national drug control strategy must target sources of supply as well. Working with source and transit nations offers the greatest prospect for eliminating foreign sources of supply. Cocaine, heroin, and frequently methamphetamine are produced outside the United States; these illegal drugs cause the greatest harm to our citizens.

  • Maintaining Strategy Flexibility -- A long-term strategy must be versatile and contain the infrastructure to respond to new drugs. America's drug problem is not static, as indicated by the recent emergence of methamphetamine. While the use of some drugs declines (e.g., cocaine), other substances make a comeback (e.g., methamphetamine, marijuana, and heroin). Still other drugs are used for the first time. Our strategy must contain the means to identify and monitor new drug use trends so that programs can address them proactively.
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Figure 5-1 represents the distribution of fiscal year 1998 federal drug control program funding by goal. The greatest proportion of spending, 35 percent, is for programs that increase the safety of America's citizens by reducing drug-related crime and violence.

Figure 5-2, a historical perspective on federal drug control spending, illustrates the six-fold increase in federal resources for drug control since FY 1985 when drug resources totaled $2.7 billion.

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