Data selecting, filtering, and mapping according to useful criteria
Chapter 4: Mapping Crime and Geographic Information Systems

The great power of GIS lies in its analytical capability, in addition to its capacity to quickly create maps of large, complex data sets. This analytical power takes more forms than can be described here, but a few examples offer the reader the general idea. (For an excellent overview, see McEwen and Taxman, 1995.) Since procedures vary according to the GIS software used, we offer a broad sketch of some possible analytical approaches. Specific details can be found in user's guides, reference manuals, tutorials, and listservs such as crimemap@aspensys.com, where many analysts pose questions and get useful answers on a variety of crime mapping topics, including how-to GIS questions.

Chapter 4: Mapping Crime and Geographic Information Systems
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Mapping Crime: Principle and Practice, by Keith Harries, Ph.D., December 1999