Recommended Readings

Critical Incident Response Group, Child Abduction and Serial Killer Unit. 1997. Child Abduction Response Plan. Quantico, VA: Federal Bureau of Investigation.

Designed for law enforcement agencies, this document is available only through the Crimes Against Children Coordinator of the local FBI Field Office. It explains essential techniques in child abduction investigations.

Echols, Mike. 1991. I Know My First Name Is Steven. Kearney, MO: Pinnacle Books.

Though not officially out of print, this book is out of stock indefinitely at the printer. Copies may be available at your local library or in larger bookstores. The author describes the long ordeal of two children who were kidnapped by Kenneth Parnell and the trauma they faced.

Federal Agency Task Force for Missing and Exploited Children. 2004. Federal Resources on Missing and Exploited Children: A Directory for Law Enforcement and Other Public and Private Agencies. Washington, DC: U.S. Department of Justice, Office of Justice Programs, Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention.

Developed for law enforcement agencies and other federal, state, and local agencies that work with missing and exploited children, this directory describes the many federal services, training programs, and resources that relate to missing and exploited children. Contact information is provided for easy access. The directory is available free of charge by calling the National Criminal Justice Reference Service (NCJRS) at 800–851–3420. If you prefer, you can download copies of the directory from the NCJRS Justice Information Web site (www.ncjrs.org).

Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention. 2002. A Family Resource Guide on International Parental Kidnapping. Washington, DC: U.S. Department of Justice, Office of Justice Programs, Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention.

This guide was developed by federal, state, and local agencies and organizations, and parents of children abducted to another country by the noncustodial parent. It offers descriptions and realistic assessments of civil and criminal remedies, explains applicable laws, identifies public and private resources, and identifies strategies to help left-behind parents recover their children or reestablish meaningful contact with them in another country. This guide is available free of charge by calling NCJRS at 800–851–3420. If you prefer, you can download copies of the guide from the NCJRS Justice Information Web site (www.ncjrs.org).

Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention. 2002. A Law Enforcement Guide on International Parental Kidnapping. Washington, DC: U.S. Department of Justice, Office of Justice Programs, Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention.

This guide is a companion to A Family Resource Guide on International Parental Kidnapping. It serves as a resource for federal, state, and local law enforcement officers who are called on to respond to international parental kidnapping cases. It offers ideas and suggestions for preventing international abductions; discusses applicable laws, legal remedies, and liability concerns; describes the role of law enforcement as both the initial responder and the investigator; and offers strategies for extradition, reunification, and recovery. This guide is available free of charge by calling NCJRS at 800–851–3420.

Turner, Johanna. 1995. Grief at Work. Washington, DC: American Hospice Foundation.

This booklet provides suggestions for employees and managers for coping with grief and loss at work. The booklet is available from the American Hospice Foundation, 1130 Connecticut Avenue NW., Suite 700, Washington, DC 20036 (202–223–0204).

Turner, Johanna. 1996. Grief at School. Washington, DC: American Hospice Foundation.

This booklet for educators and counselors provides suggestions for helping children to cope with crisis and grief in the school setting. The booklet is available from the American Hospice Foundation, 1130 Connecticut Avenue NW., Suite 700, Washington, DC 20036 (202–223–0204).

Walsh, John. 1997. Tears of Rage. New York, NY: Pocket Books.

This book recounts the powerful and emotional story of John Walsh and his wife Revé following the 1981 abduction and murder of their 6-year-old son Adam. The book also chronicles John Walsh’s 16-year exhaustive efforts on behalf of missing and exploited children. Available in bookstores.

Ward, Heather Patricia. 1994. I Promise I’ll Find You. Ontario, Canada: Firefly Books.

This heartwarming children’s book tells the story of a mother who promises to do everything humanly possible to find her child should that child ever become lost or missing from home. Available in bookstores.

Publications From the National Center for Missing & Exploited Children®

Single copies of the following books and up to 50 copies of each brochure are available free of charge from the National Center for Missing & Exploited Children®(800-THE-LOST® or 800-843-5678).

Books

Family Abduction Guide
Written in both English and Spanish, this guide describes the actions that parents and family members can take and the laws that can help when their child is abducted.

Missing and Abducted Children: A Law Enforcement Guide to Case Investigation and Program Management
This document provides law enforcement with a step-by-step guide on how to respond to and investigate missing children cases.

Recovery and Reunification of Missing Children: A Team Approach
This report discusses the recovery and reunification of children with their families, with emphasis on a multiagency, multidisciplinary approach.

Brochures
Child Safety on the Information Highway

Teen Safety on the Information Highway

The following brochures, written in both English and Spanish, are part of the Just in Case Series and offer step-by-step instructions for dealing with a variety of issues relating to missing and exploited children.

Just in Case . . . Guidelines in Case You Are Considering Day Care

Just in Case . . . Guidelines in Case You Are Considering Family Separation*

Just in Case . . . Guidelines in Case You Need a Babysitter

Just in Case . . . Guidelines in Case Your Child Is Testifying in Court

Just in Case . . . Guidelines in Case Your Child Might Someday Be a Runaway*

Just in Case . . . Guidelines in Case Your Child Might Someday Be Missing*

Just in Case . . . Guidelines in Case Your Child Might Someday Be the Victim of Sexual Exploitation*

Just in Case . . . Guidelines in Dealing With Grief Following the Loss of a Child

Just in Case . . . Guidelines in Finding Professional Help in Case Your Child Is Missing or the Victim of Sexual Exploitation

Just in Case . . . Guidelines on Using the Federal Parent Locator Service in Cases of Parental Kidnaping and Child Custody

The following brochures, part of the Know the Rules Series, provide information and tips for children, teenagers, and parents on a variety of topics relating to child exploitation, victimization, and safety.

Know the Rules . . . Abduction and Kidnapping Prevention Tips for Parents

Know the Rules . . . After School Safety Tips for Children Who Are Home Alone

Know the Rules . . . Child Safety for Door-to-Door Solicitation

Know the Rules . . . For Child Safety in Amusement or Theme Parks

Know the Rules . . . For Child Safety in Youth Sports

Know the Rules . . . For Going To and From School More Safely

Know the Rules . . . General Parental Tips To Help Keep Your Children Safer

Know the Rules . . . Safety Tips for Halloween

Know the Rules . . . Safety Tips for Teens

Know the Rules . . . Safety Tips for the Holidays

Know the Rules . . . School Safety Tips

Know the Rules . . . Summer Safety Tips for Children

Know the Rules . . . Summer Safety Tips for Parents

Know the Rules . . . When Your Child Is Flying Unaccompanied

Know the Rules . . . When Your Child Is Traveling Unaccompanied by Bus or Train

Knowing My 8 Rules for Safety


Previous Contents Next


When Your Child Is Missing: A Family Survival Guide OJJDP Report • May 2004