FIT Training
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The Female Intervention Team

Focusing on the above criteria for gender-specific programming was helpful in the development of FIT. Training in how to meet the criteria became a first and essential step in developing and providing productive services. The second step was a request for additional staff to keep caseloads in the FIT unit at a manageable level. The unit also learned that any programs developed would have to provide services addressing the girls' immediate needs.


Training became a first and essential step in developing and providing productive services.

The first training for the case managers came from the Maryland Infant and Toddlers Program. The program designed a 1-day training seminar to help case managers recognize the developmental stages of infants and toddlers. The seminar also helped staff identify issues faced by pregnant and parenting teens. A 1992 Department of Juvenile Services (DJS) report stated: "A health record review of girls detained and committed to facilities showed a myriad of health problems and indicated that DJS must look at these girls not only as individual teenagers but also as mothers and potential mothers" (Department of Juvenile Services, 1992). Of the 313 girls in detention facilities and the secure committed unit between May 1991 and March 1992, 44 girls were pregnant and 43 were mothers. Additional training was made available to FIT case managers at no cost to the department.

Female Intervention Team's Mission

The Female Intervention Team seeks to restore hope to young women who have lost their direction and focus and lack goals. It accomplishes this through a variety of programs and services designed specifically for the female offender.

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