New Publications

Guide for Implementing or Enhancing an Endangered Missing Advisory Guide for Implementing or Enhancing an Endangered Missing Advisory (Report)
NCJ 232001

Over the past two decades, the AMBER Alert program has significantly improved the strategies and the methods for recovering endangered and abducted children. Despite such progress, gaps remain in the recovery of missing children whose cases do not meet the strict criteria for AMBER Alert and of missing adults, whose cases are not covered by AMBER Alert. Guide for Implementing or Enhancing an Endangered Missing Advisory will assist in closing these gaps by providing AMBER Alert coordinators, law enforcement, and public safety professionals with an effective and efficient way to implement an Endangered Missing Advisory plan. The publication offers recommendations to assist law enforcement in developing strategies to recover missing children and adults and includes relevant findings to inform policymakers' efforts to address the problem.

To order a printed copy, visit the NCJRS Web site.

Highlights From Pathways to Desistance: A Longitudinal Study of Serious Adolescent Offenders Highlights From Pathways to Desistance: A Longitudinal Study of Serious Adolescent Offenders (Fact Sheet)
NCJ 230971

The Pathways to Desistance Study is a large collaborative, multidisciplinary project that is following 1,354 serious juvenile offenders ages 14–18 for 7 years after their conviction. This study has collected the most comprehensive dataset currently available about serious adolescent offenders and their lives in late adolescence and early adulthood. It looks at the factors that lead youth who have committed serious offenses to continue or desist from offending, including individual maturation, life changes, and involvement with the juvenile and criminal justice systems. This fact sheet summarizes the most important findings of the study to date: Most youth who commit felonies greatly reduce their offending over time; longer stays in juvenile institutions do not reduce recidivism; in the period after incarceration, community-based supervision is effective for youth who have committed serious offenses; and substance abuse treatment reduces both substance use and criminal offending for a limited time.

To order a printed copy, visit the NCJRS Web site.