OJJDP News @ A GlanceOJP Seal
OJJDP News @ A Glance
September | October 2011

  Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention  ·  Jeff Slowikowski, Acting Administrator
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OJJDP National Conference for Children's Justice and Safety: Unite, Build, Lead

National Conference logo
Dr. Jill Biden, wife of Vice President Joe Biden; Attorney General Eric Holder; Deputy Attorney General James Cole; Deputy Associate Attorney General Karol Mason; General Raymond T. Odierno, Chief of Staff for the U.S. Army; and Congressmen Bobby Scott (D-VA) and Chris Murphy (D-CT) were among the many dignitaries who attended OJJDP's National Conference on October 12–14, 2011.

Photo of attendees at National Conference
OJJDP's National Conference for Children's Justice and Safety featured 7 plenaries, 330 speakers, and more than 65 workshops and sessions.
The conference drew more than 2,300 public officials, tribal representatives, juvenile justice practitioners, policymakers, law enforcement professionals, child advocates, educators, and researchers to address key issues in the juvenile justice field. The event featured 7 plenaries, 330 speakers, and more than 65 workshops and sessions. This event for children's justice and safety was the first national conference OJJDP has held since 2006.

Photo of South Shore Drill Team performing at the National Conference
Youth participation in the conference included two performances by Chicago's South Shore Drill Team. Approximately 85 percent of team members come from inner-city neighborhoods where they are at risk for gang and drug activity. In addition to training in precision drilling, the South Shore Drill Team offers youth educational support and employment training.
The event featured special tracks on children's exposure to violence, anti-gang strategies, child protection and advocacy, truancy and dropping out, at-risk and delinquent girls, trends in tribal youth policy, evidence-based practices, and reforming the treatment of juveniles in custody, among other topics.

Youth participated in breakout sessions on family engagement during youth custody, anti-gang strategies, and youth violence prevention; peer-to-peer roundtable discussions; and a listening session with federal leadership.

The conference also featured songs by the choir of the Benjamin Orr School in Washington, DC; the presentation of colors by the Junior ROTC Honor Guard from Crossland High School in Temple Hills, MD; and two performances by Chicago's South Shore Drill Team.

OJJDP-Defense Department Mentoring Partnership

Photo of Dr. Jill Biden, Second Lady of the United States
In highlighting the $20 million mentoring partnership between the U.S. Departments of Justice and Defense, Dr. Jill Biden called on all Americans to contribute time and resources to support military families.
In her remarks in a session entitled "Children's Justice and Safety: A New Partnership To Support Military Families" on October 14, Dr. Biden highlighted the recent announcement of a joint partnership between the U.S. Departments of Justice and Defense to award $20 million to nine organizations to support mentoring programs and services for youth with a parent in the military. Approximately $17 million of the funding will be given to Boys & Girls Clubs of America, Big Brothers Big Sisters, and the National 4-H Council. More than $3 million in additional grants have been awarded to multistate mentoring initiatives, including the Cal Ripken, Sr. Foundation, KidsPeace, and others.

"As a teacher and a military mom and grandmother, I have seen firsthand what a big difference a great mentor can make in the lives of our nation's military children," said Dr. Biden. "These mentors and so many other individuals and groups across this country are showing all Americans that there are countless ways to help our military families—some large and many small, but all important."

Dr. Biden was joined on the podium by Attorney General Holder; Army Chief of Staff Odierno; Laurie O. Robinson, Assistant Attorney General, Office of Justice Programs; and military families and mentors from Big Brothers Big Sisters of the National Capital Area and the Boys & Girls Club of Greater Washington.

Photo of Attorney General Eric Holder
In his remarks at the National Conference, Attorney General Eric Holder underscored the importance of helping children of military service members develop resiliency skills and of promoting the stability of military families.
Attorney General Holder said the mentoring programs will help children of military service members develop resiliency skills, build healthy lifestyles, acquire career training, and connect with other military families. "Above all," he added, "they will promote stability, discourage youth violence, and help to support and strengthen the . . . families that have given and sacrificed so much to keep this country safe."

The Attorney General also emphasized a range of other issues on which the Justice Department places a high priority, including ensuring that the education system is a doorway of opportunity and not a point of entry to the criminal justice system; expanding the juvenile justice field's knowledge base and investing in research that can help law enforcement identify crime hot spots and target resources more efficiently; and working to reintegrate juvenile offenders more effectively into their communities.

Following are descriptions of other conference highlights:

Children's Exposure to Violence

According to the National Survey of Children's Exposure to Violence, most children and adolescents in this country are exposed to violence in their daily lives. More than 60 percent of the youth surveyed were exposed to violence, crime, or abuse within the past year. To address this serious problem, in 2010, Attorney General Eric Holder launched Defending Childhood, an initiative that aims to prevent children's exposure to violence, mitigate the negative impact of children's exposure to violence when it does occur, and develop knowledge and spread awareness about children's exposure to violence.

Logo of Defending ChildhoodAt OJJDP's National Conference, Deputy Associate Attorney General Mason announced the creation of a new National Task Force on Children Exposed to Violence. The task force is composed of 14 leading experts from diverse fields and perspectives, including practitioners, child and family advocates, academic experts, and licensed clinicians. Following four public hearings to be held around the country, the task force will issue a report to the Attorney General that will serve as a blueprint for addressing children's exposure to violence across the United States.

Photo of Joe Torre, co-chairman of the Attorney General's National Task Force on Children Exposed to 					     Violence
Speaking at the National Conference about his new role as co-chairman of the Attorney General's National Task Force on Children Exposed to Violence, Joe Torre said, "We'll continue to make strides to address this terrible public health issue, and when it's all said and done, we'll save a lot of lives."
The task force will be co-chaired by Joe Torre, Major League Baseball's Executive Vice President for Baseball Operations and Chairman of the Board of the Joe Torre Safe at Home Foundation, an organization that educates students, parents, and teachers about the effects of domestic violence. Mr. Torre, who spoke at a conference working luncheon, described his own experiences growing up in a violent household.

"I carried scars into my adult life," said Torre. "This is not just a women's issue. . . . Domestic violence is a public health issue. We need to talk about it. We need to find solutions. . . . And awareness is the biggest deterrence."

The conference also included the following Defending Childhood workshops:

At the conference, Deputy Associate Attorney General Mason announced the release of Children's Exposure to Intimate Partner Violence and Other Family Violence; Polyvictimization: Children's Exposure to Multiple Types of Violence, Crime, and Abuse; and the fact sheet, Questions and Answers About the National Survey of Children's Exposure to Violence.

Youth Violence/Gangs

Photo National Forum on Youth Violence Prevention
Maria Pineda Cruz (l.) and Debbie Aguilar, who attended the conference as part of a group of 30 youth and families sponsored by Casey Family Programs, participated in the "National Forum on Youth Violence Prevention" and workshops related to family and youth engagement. Both women have both lost sons to gun violence in their city (Salinas, CA) and are working with the National Forum on Youth Violence Prevention to create safer communities in Salinas and throughout the country.
In a workshop on October 12, panelists discussed how each of the six cities participating in the National Forum on Youth Violence Prevention—Boston, Chicago, Detroit, Memphis, Salinas, CA, and San Jose, CA—created comprehensive data-driven and multidisciplinary efforts to address their unique youth violence issues. The forum, launched at the direction President Barack Obama, allows participating localities to share challenges and promising strategies with each other and to explore how federal agencies can better support local efforts. Each city has developed strategies to reduce violence, improve opportunities for youth, and encourage innovation at the local and federal levels.

Photo of Father Gregory Boyle, S.J., founder of Homeboy Industries
In remarks offered at a plenary session on October 13, Father Gregory Boyle, S.J. said that the goal of Homeboy Industries, the nation's largest gang intervention and reentry program, is not only to deliver services, but to develop a sense of "kinship" and "mutuality." Former gang rivals work side by side in Homeboy Industries' bakery and other businesses.
Father Gregory Boyle, S.J., founder of Homeboy Industries, the nation's largest gang-intervention and reentry program, described in a plenary session on October 13 how the program helps at-risk and formerly gang-involved youth to change the course of their lives through a range of programs including counseling, education, substance abuse and addiction assistance, job training, and job placement.

"There has never been a hopeful kid who joins a gang," Father Boyle said. "No one is seeking something when joining a gang, but rather they are fleeing something."

Located in Los Angeles, Homeboy Industries focuses on providing positive alternatives and a more hopeful future for at-risk and gang-involved youth. After job-readiness training, youth can work in Homeboy Industries' bakery and farmers' markets, as well as the program's solar panel installation, silkscreen, restaurant, and catering businesses.

Anti-gang strategies were discussed at numerous conference workshops, including:

Child Protection and Advocacy

In welcoming remarks on October 12, Deputy Attorney General James Cole reviewed the progress that has been made in protecting children from abduction, abuse, and exploitation. He highlighted the contributions of AMBER Alert, the Internet Crimes Against Children Task Force program, and the partnership between the Missing-Child Clearinghouse Program and the National Center for Missing & Exploited Children (NCMEC).

Photo of Elizabeth Smart, President of the Elizabeth Smart Foundation
Elizabeth Smart, who was abducted from her Salt Lake City home in June 2002 and recovered 9 months later, stressed the importance of empowering children through activity-based programs that offer concrete skills for resisting a would-be abductor and keeping them safe.
Elizabeth Smart, President of the Elizabeth Smart Foundation, joined Ernie Allen, NCMEC's President and CEO, to speak about the importance of keeping public attention focused on the issue of missing and exploited children at a time of budget constraints. Ms. Smart, who was abducted from her home in Salt Lake City, UT, in June 2002 and recovered 9 months later, highlighted the work of radKIDS, an organization that offers family-centered safety education programs that emphasize essential decisionmaking skills as well as physical resistance options to escape violence.

"There are 250,000 radKIDS today," said Ms. Smart. "I can't go back in time and change my past, but I can say it would have made a difference to me."

The luncheon keynote speech, presented by Dr. Sharon Cooper, CEO of Developmental and Forensic Pediatrics at the University of North Carolina/Chapel Hill School of Medicine, focused on the sexualization of children by the mass media, entertainment, and fashion. Dr. Cooper warned that such images, which often include violent themes, "promote the objectification of children" and "normalize sexual harm" to young people.

Many sessions throughout the conference touched on strategies for protecting and advocating for children, including the following workshops:

Truancy and Dropping Out

In a workshop entitled "Creating Conditions for Learning: Stopping School Dropout and Improving Graduation Rates," Ken Seeley, President of the National Center for School Engagement, joined Jonathan Cohen, Ph.D., President of the National School Climate Center to discuss the most current research and practices regarding school engagement and creating learning conditions that promote youth staying in school.

Dr. Seeley described OJJDP-funded research by the National Center for School Engagement that found that a caring school community, in which individual students are meaningfully challenged and supported by the adults around them, can serve as a powerful antidote to the process by which victimization distances students from learning and leads to truancy, academic failure, and other problems.

Other conference workshops on the topic of truancy and dropping out included:

At-Risk and Delinquent Girls

The large number of girls in the juvenile justice system and the high rates of exposure to violence among these girls pose special challenges and obligations for juvenile justice facilities and programs. Research and experience highlight the link between the experience of trauma, the lack of appropriate treatment, and behaviors that lead to involvement in the justice system. In a mini-plenary on the opening day of the conference entitled "The Real Deal: Girls and Trauma," panelists shared the latest research as well as recommendations for meeting the needs of girls who have been exposed to trauma in their lives.

The conference also included the following workshops:

Trends in Tribal Youth Policy

Photo of panel discussion on Tribal Law and Order Act
In a workshop on October 12, panelists discussed the impact of the Tribal Law and Order Act (TLOA) on youth in Indian country. President Barack Obama signed TLOA into law in July 2010. Panelists are (from l. to r.) Walter Lamar, Lamar Associates; Chris Chaney, Office of Tribal Justice, Bureau of Indian Affairs; and Brendan Johnson, U.S. Attorney, District of South Dakota. The moderator for the panel discussion (shown speaking at the lectern) was Laura Ansera, OJJDP's Tribal Youth Program Coordinator.
Many American Indian and Alaska Native (AI/AN) communities lack comprehensive programs to address juvenile delinquency, violence, and other serious problems such as substance abuse and high truancy and dropout rates. Three workshops focused on recent efforts to assist the field in better understanding the needs of tribal youth and communities and developing strategies that work most effectively to address those needs:

Evidence-Based Practices

Logo of Crime SolutionsFor years, policymakers and practitioners have struggled with how to implement the most effective prevention and treatment programs to reduce delinquency and recidivism rates and to improve outcomes for youth. Workshops and presentations throughout the conference focused on translating the extensive research available about the effectiveness of juvenile justice programs into improved everyday juvenile justice practice. Following are a few examples the sessions offered:

Reforming the Treatment of Juveniles in Custody

Photo of youth participants in panel, Effective Youth Engagement and Best Practices for Sustaining Youth Leadership
Photo courtesy of the Coalition for Juvenile Justice.

In a forum entitled "Effective Youth Engagement and Best Practices for Sustaining Youth Leadership," youth leaders with first-hand experience in the juvenile justice and child welfare systems shared their perspectives about ways to foster youth leadership and actively support youth engagement and partnership. Shown above (from l. to r.) are Brandon MacMillian (Washington, DC); Drew Peterman (Boise, ID); and Tawana Burks (Detroit, MI).

In a mini-plenary on October 13 entitled "Family Voices in Juvenile Justice," parents of youth in custody shared their experiences with their children's involvement in the juvenile justice system, and recommended ideas for change. They discussed how to create community dialog, system reform, and successful family engagement.

The following workshops also addressed the need to reform the treatment of juveniles in custody:

Resources:

The conference program is available online. To request copies of PowerPoint presentations for the OJJDP National Conference on October 12–14, as well as for the preconference grantee trainings and learning labs on October 10–11, visit the National Training and Technical Assistance Center Web site.

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Journal of Juvenile Justice Launched

Logo for OJJDP's Journal of Juvenile Justice
OJJDP's new online Journal of Juvenile Justice is an accessible, practical tool for a diverse researcher and practitioner audience. The semi-annual, peer-reviewed journal will address a variety of issues in juvenile justice, ranging from delinquency prevention to evaluation of treatment approaches.

The inaugural issue covers topics ranging from the unique risk factors associated with crossover youth to the benefits of comprehensive restorative justice programs. Articles that report the findings from evaluations of Parents Anonymous and King County's Child Protection Mediation pilot program highlight strategies that demonstrate promise in reducing child maltreatment and increasing the efficiency of case processing, respectively. Additionally, the journal includes items on the development of standards for defining and measuring recidivism and a method that may be used to improve the reliability of juvenile justice screening and assessment instruments.

Since its establishment, OJJDP has developed an extensive research program that includes ground-breaking longitudinal work, unprecedented data collections and surveys, and many comprehensive program evaluations focusing on juvenile crime, delinquency, and victimization. Housing a juvenile research program within an office that also funds juvenile justice programs and services has allowed OJJDP to seed its research into many other activities. Consequently, knowledge gained through research, evaluation, and statistical efforts has informed and strengthened the development of victimization and delinquency prevention and intervention programs, standards, and training and technical assistance. Additionally, OJJDP's responsibility to disseminate information to the field ensures that new research findings make their way into the hands of practitioners and policymakers.

Although OJJDP's research agenda is ambitious, it cannot possibly answer the diversity of questions generated by an evolving juvenile justice field. Innovative research is being conducted across the country and around the world, and OJJDP welcomes submissions from all arenas that represent sound scientific principles on topics of concern to the field.


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OJJDP Publishes Emergency Planning Guide for Juvenile Justice Residential Facilities

Photo of flood conditions in New Orleans, LA

OJJDP has released a new publication to assist juvenile justice residential facilities in preparing for, responding to, and recovering from emergencies. Emergency Planning for Juvenile Justice Residential Facilities is the first comprehensive planning guide to address the specific needs of facility staff and children, youth, and families involved in the justice system during an emergency.

The document was developed in response to the National Commission on Children and Disasters' recommendation in October 2009 that OJJDP form a working group whose mission is to improve juvenile justice emergency preparedness nationwide. In response, OJJDP established the Justice Working Group on Children and Disasters made up of staff from federal agencies, experts in emergency planning, juvenile justice practitioners, mental and behavioral health professionals, and educators—many of whom administered programs or were first responders in a major emergency during the past 5 years.

For months, the working group members met to share resources and experiences in the area of emergency planning, response, and recovery. Emergency Planning for Juvenile Justice Residential Facilities is the result of their work.

The guide is divided into 12 sections. Section 1 provides an overview of the planning process and provides information about:

Sections 2–12 provide an indepth look at key issues for juvenile justice residential facilities to consider as they write or update their plans. These include:

A list of references and resources at the end of the document provides additional sources of information about how to best prepare for, respond to, and recover from emergencies.

"Through the guidance offered in this document, we encourage facilities to develop comprehensive emergency plans that will make a real and tangible difference in the safety and well-being of the most vulnerable individuals in our nation's justice system. These young people, their families, and the staff who care for them deserve nothing less," said Laurie O. Robinson, Assistant Attorney General for the Office of Justice Programs.

Resource:

To order a printed copy of Emergency Planning for Juvenile Justice Residential Facilities, visit the National Criminal Justice Reference Service Web site.


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OJJDP Bulletin Presents Findings From Hot Spots Policing Study

Photo of three youth talking to each other
An OJJDP-funded study reveals that juvenile crime tends to concentrate in discrete areas where youth congregate, and that police resources are used most efficiently when law enforcement focuses specifically on these places to deter crime.

OJJDP has published these and other findings in the bulletin, Hot Spots of Juvenile Crime: Findings From Seattle. The bulletin provides the first portrait of the distribution of officially recorded juvenile crime events in smaller geographical areas—such as a favorite gathering place in a mall, restaurant, or shop—rather than certain police precincts or beats, the larger areas usually patrolled by police.

Between 1989 and 2002, researchers led by Dr. David Weisburd—a distinguished criminologist and leading researcher in the field of hot spots policing—geographically mapped the crime incidents in which a juvenile was arrested in Seattle to identify the rates and hot spots of juvenile crime in the city. Following are some of the study's key findings:

Resource:
To order a printed copy of Hot Spots of Juvenile Crime: Findings From Seattle, visit the National Criminal Justice Reference Service Web site.


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Upcoming Events

American Society of Criminology Annual Meeting: November 16–19, 2011

The American Society of Criminology's 2011 meeting, "Breaking the Mold: Innovations and Bold Ventures in Criminology," to be held in Washington, DC, will offer more than 300 sessions and roundtables on the measurement, etiology, consequences, prevention, control, and treatment of crime and delinquency. Included among the juvenile justice topics to be covered are Incarceration, Families, and Reentry; Perceptions and Stereotypes of Juveniles in the Justice System; Assessing and Addressing Racial and Ethnic Disparities in Juvenile Case Processing; Gendered Juvenile Justice: Girls' Experiences; Parenting and Delinquency; Abuse, Victimization, and Offending; Alcohol and Crime; Adolescent Intimate Partner Violence and Victimization; Advances in the Study of Gangs; Youth Gangs: Risk Factors and Typologies; Cyberbullying; Voices of Incarcerated Youth; Social Networks and Juvenile Delinquency Among Latino Youth; and School Punishment and Zero Tolerance Policies. More information about the meeting including program, hotel arrangements, and registration is available online.

Global Youth Justice's and Youth Justice USA's 2nd International Training Institute:
December 6–8, 2011

Global Youth Justice and Youth Justice USA will convene the International Training Institute, "Establish or Enhance a Local Youth Court or Teen Court," in Las Vegas, NV. Topics to be covered include training adult and youth volunteers, offering quality community service programs, holding family intake meetings, implementing operational and administrative procedures, identifying funding and resource opportunities, analyzing legal and liability issues, building partnerships with memorandums of understanding, evaluating programs, juvenile referral sources, and grant writing. Registration information is available online.

Poster for 26th Annual San Diego International Conference on Child and Family Maltreatment26th Annual San Diego International Conference on Child and Family Maltreatment: January 23–26, 2012

Sponsored by OJJDP and the Chadwick Center for Children and Families at Rady's Children's Hospital–San Diego, this conference that will take place in San Diego, CA. Workshops will cover a range of topics, including legal issues, investigations, technology, training, mental health, trauma treatment, forensic interviewing, research, prevention, child welfare, and child advocacy center management. Registration is available online.

National Conference on Juvenile and Family Law: March 21–24, 2012

Organized by the National Council of Juvenile and Family Court Judges, the conference will feature innovations in programming and practice and provide new opportunities for courts and communities to improve outcomes for children, youth, families, and victims. The conference, which will be held in Las Vegas, NV, will focus on the challenges faced by many children and families, including child abuse and neglect, mental health, delinquency, custody, immigration, domestic violence, and substance abuse. Registration is available online.

18th National Conference on Child Abuse & Neglect: April 16–20, 2012

Logo for 18th National Conference on Child Abuse & NeglectThis annual conference, sponsored by the Children's Bureau's Office on Child Abuse and Neglect (Administration on Children, Youth and Families, U.S. Department of Health and Human Services) is one of the field's leading training and technical assistance events. "Celebrating the Past—Imagining the Future," will take place next spring in Washington, DC. More details about the conference will be available in the coming months. Registration will open in early 2012.

31st Annual National CASA Conference: June 9–12, 2012

Each year, more than 1,400 court-appointed special advocates (CASA) and guardian ad litem staff, board members, volunteers, judges, attorneys and other child welfare professionals gather to connect with peers and learn from leaders in the field. The 2012 National CASA Conference will take place in Washington, DC. Subscribe to receive conference e-mail updates and registration information.


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News in Brief

Attorney General Hosts Summit Focused on Prevention, Deterrence, and Interdiction of Child Sexual Exploitation

On October 14, 2011, Attorney General Eric Holder convened a panel of experts from Facebook, Microsoft, and the National Center for Missing & Exploited Children to discuss concrete ways to prevent and deter child sexual exploitation at a national summit entitled, "A Call to Action: Protecting Children From Sexual Exploitation." Attorney General Holder, who has made one of the U.S. Department of Justice's (DOJ's) key priorities the protection of children and other victims of human trafficking and exploitation, hosted three expert panels to explore solutions to this crime.

The summit brought together hundreds of attendees from law enforcement, industry, and child advocacy organizations. That collaboration delivers on a key goal laid out in the department's National Strategy for Child Exploitation Prevention and Interdiction, which was launched last year. In the strategy, the department pledged to seek innovative solutions to this problem from inside and outside the government. An important deliverable from the summit will include recommendations by the expert panelists for the Attorney General to consider in DOJ's fight to stop child exploitation and abuse.

Cover of Juvenile Justice Training Needs Assessment: A Survey of Law EnforcementIACP Releases Findings From Survey on Juvenile Justice Training Needs of Law Enforcement

The International Association of Chiefs of Police has published Juvenile Justice Training Needs Assessment: A Survey of Law Enforcement. The report includes findings from a survey of law enforcement officers across the nation, which identified the challenges and training needs law enforcement faces when working with juvenile crime, delinquency, and victimization. The report describes data on department training budgets and needs, juvenile justice operations, and the most pressing juvenile justice issues for the jurisdictions included in the survey. The full report is available online, as are highlights of the report.

Second Annual Bullying Prevention Summit

The U.S. Department of Education, in partnership with other federal agencies, sponsored the second annual Bullying Prevention Summit on September 21–22, 2011, in Washington, DC. The event brought together representatives from federal agencies, national organizations, parents, teachers, and students to discuss and share progress on antibullying efforts across the country.

"Bullying affects not only the child or children it targets, but the entire community that surrounds them—their parents, their classmates, even the child engaging in the bullying," said Education Secretary Arne Duncan. "Keeping our children safe is everyone's responsibility, and I'm proud to come together with so many national leaders, parents, teachers, and students to reaffirm our collective commitment to prevent bullying in every way possible."

Over the past year, the Education Department has partnered with OJJDP to host Webinars addressing topics such as when bullying constitutes harassment and how to constructively intervene in bullying situations.

Cover of Tribal Youth in the Federal Justice SystemReport on Tribal Youth in the Federal Justice System Now Available

Tribal Youth in the Federal Justice System, cosponsored by OJJDP and the Bureau of Justice Statistics, is now available online. The report describes findings from a study that explored issues surrounding American Indian youth who were processed in the federal justice system, using data from the Federal Justice Statistics Program collected between 1999 and 2008, and interviews with tribal and federal officials. Specifically, the report discusses the prevalence, characteristics, and outcomes of these youth at each stage of the justice system. Photocopies of the document may be ordered online.

Internet Crimes Against Children Task Forces Praised as "Undersung Heroes"

The September 2011 issue of Health Affairs, a monthly health policy journal, features an essay describing how one Internet Crimes Against Children (ICAC) task force helped administrators at Rady Children's Hospital in San Diego, CA, identify two staff members engaging in child molestation and pornography. Both individuals were arrested, convicted, and are currently serving sentences. "Looking back at the experience, I've realized there was an undersung hero in our hospital's story: the Internet Crimes Against Children Task Forces, such as the one in San Diego," said the article's author, Blair L. Sadler, who was the hospital's executive officer in 2006, when the story unfolded. The ICAC Task Force program is a national network of 61 coordinated task forces representing nearly 3,000 federal, state, and local law enforcement and prosecutorial agencies. In fiscal year 2011, OJJDP awarded $30 million to support the program. A recording of Mr. Sadler reading his essay is available online.

Logo for FBI's Child ID AppFBI Launches Child ID Mobile App

The Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI) has launched the Child ID App. This free mobile App provides a convenient place to electronically store photos and vital information about one's children that can be easily provided to authorities if a child goes missing.

The App allows users to send information—including pictures or other physical identifiers such as height and weight—to authorities with a few clicks. It also provides tips on keeping children safe and guidance on what to do in the first few crucial hours after a child goes missing.

The Child ID App is currently available for use on iPhones and can be downloaded for free from the App Store on iTunes. The FBI is planning to expand the tool to other types of mobile devices in the near future. More information about the FBI's Child ID App is available online. The App can be downloaded for free from the App Store on iTunes.

Webinar on Wraparound Services in Indian Country Available Online

On September 22, 2011, OJJDP and Education Development Center sponsored a Webinar on implementing the wraparound model in Indian country. The model incorporates traditional tribal teachings and involves a continuum of services, including employment programs, family and individual counseling, substance abuse treatment, and academic programs in response to the individual needs of tribal youth and their families. Deb Painte, Executive Director, Native American Training Institute, and Joe Walker, Evaluator, Native American Training Institute, discussed how the wraparound model differs from standard treatment approaches, how wraparound services are appropriate for tribal youth in the juvenile justice system and their families, and how the model can be incorporated into the tribal juvenile justice system. All materials, including an audio/video recording of the Webinar, can be found online.

OJJDP's Acting Administrator Lends Support to U.S. Department of Labor's $20 Million Reentry Project

The U.S. Department of Labor (DOL) recently announced the award of Civic Justice Corps program grants totaling $20 million to 15 organizations to provide formerly incarcerated youth ages 18–24 with community service projects, educational interventions, career development activities, and other programs that reconnect youth with their communities and offer pathways to success.

In September, OJJDP Acting Administrator Jeff Slowikowski sent a letter to administrative law judges in local jurisdictions of organizations receiving the grants expressing support for the initiative. Mr. Slowikowski stressed the importance of "linking young adults with a history of juvenile justice involvement with organizations that can improve their skills and long-term employment prospects." He urged the letter's recipients to consider referring young offenders who are under the extended age of juvenile court jurisdiction to the DOL-supported Civic Justice Corps initiative.

Eligible individuals include those who are on probation from the juvenile system, who have received an alternative sentence or were diverted before adjudication as an alternative to juvenile prosecution, or who have been incarcerated in the juvenile justice system within the past year. Electronic copies of the letter were sent to executive directors of designated state juvenile justice agencies, juvenile justice specialists, and State Advisory Group chairs.

For nearly a quarter-century, OJJDP has been committed to supporting the successful reintegration of juvenile offenders into their communities. In fiscal year 2011, OJJDP awarded more than $14.2 million in grants for juvenile justice reentry programs under the Second Chance Act of 2007.


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New Publications

All OJJDP publications may be viewed and downloaded on the publications section of the OJJDP Web site. Print publications also may be ordered online at the National Criminal Justice Reference Service (NCJRS) Web site.

National Survey of Children's Exposure to Violence Publication Series

Cover of Children's  Exposure to Intimate Partner Violence and Other Family Violence Children's Exposure to Intimate Partner Violence and Other Family Violence (Bulletin)
NCJ 232272

This bulletin explores in depth the NatSCEV survey results regarding exposure to family violence among children in the United States, including exposure to intimate partner violence, assaults by parents on siblings of children surveyed, and other assaults involving teen and adult household members. These results confirm that children are exposed to unacceptable rates of violence in the home.

To order a printed copy, visit the NCJRS Web site.

Cover of Poly-Victimization:  Multiple Exposures to Violence, Crime, and Abuse in a National Sample of  Children Polyvictimization: Children's Exposure to Multiple Types of Violence, Crime, and Abuse (Bulletin)
NCJ 235504

All too often, children are victims of crime, violence, and abuse. Some children suffer several different kinds of such victimization even over a relatively brief timespan. These children and youth are at particularly high risk for lasting physical, mental, and emotional harm. This bulletin focuses on polyvictimization (defined as having experienced multiple victimization of different kinds, such as sexual abuse, physical abuse, bullying, and exposure to family violence). Among the characteristics that distinguish polyvictims from children who are less exposed to violence are the more serious nature of their vicitmizations and their overrepresentation among certain demographic groups, including boys, African American children, and children in single-parent, stepparent, and other adult caregiver families.

To order a printed copy, visit the NCJRS Web site.

Cover of Questions  and Answers About the National Survey of Children's Exposure to Violence Questions and Answers About the National Survey of Children's Exposure to Violence (Fact Sheet)
NCJ 235163

This fact sheet offers an overview of the National Survey of Children's Exposure to Violence (NatSCEV), the most comprehensive nationwide survey of the incidence and prevalence of children's exposure to violence to date and sponsored by OJJDP and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. It outlines the survey's objectives and key features, how exposure to violence was measured, and plans for followup surveys and publications. The survey interviewed caregivers of children ages 9 and younger and children 10 and older about 45 different kinds of violence, abuse, and victimization in the past year and over the course of their lifetime. NatSCEV bases its estimates on a large, nationally representative sample of more than 4,500 children ages 17 and younger.

To order a printed copy, visit the NCJRS Web site.

Other Publications

Cover of Emergency  Planning for Juvenile Justice Residential Facilities Emergency Planning for Juvenile Justice Residential Facilities (Guide)
NCJ 234936

Prepared by the OJJDP-led Justice Working Group on Children and Disasters, this guide assists juvenile justice residential facilities in preparing for, responding to, and recovering from emergencies. The document addresses a range of issues, including information sharing across agencies, alternate locations for housing youth, evacuation, emergency staffing of juvenile justice facilities, communication, and mental health services.

To order a printed copy, visit the NCJRS Web site.

Cover of Hot Spots of Juvenile Crime: Findings From Seattle Hot Spots of Juvenile Crime: Findings From Seattle (Bulletin)
NCJ 231575

Identifying the locations and conditions under which juveniles commit crimes can help law enforcement develop prevention strategies. Crime tends to cluster in hot spots where motivated offenders find available targets and a lack of supervision. Over a 14-year period, from 1989 to 2002, researchers mapped all crime incidents in Seattle in which a juvenile between ages 8 and 17 was arrested. They located juvenile crime hot spots, determined juvenile crime trends, and identified risk factors for juvenile crime.

To order a printed copy, visit the NCJRS Web site.

Cover of National Center for Youth in Custody National Center for Youth in Custody (Fact Sheet)
NCJ 235770

This fact sheet provides an overview of the mission, objectives, and services of the recently launched National Center for Youth in Custody. Emphasizing the rehabilitative goals of the juvenile justice system, the center will deliver training and technical assistance; identify, document, and promote evidence-based approaches to working with youth in custody; and serve as a resource for juvenile justice practitioners, youth in custody, and families. The center will provide training curriculums, Webinars, and professional development, among other services.

To order a printed copy, visit the NCJRS Web site.

Cover of Trying  Juveniles as Adults: An Analysis of State Transfer Laws and Reporting Trying Juveniles as Adults: An Analysis of State Transfer Laws and Reporting (Bulletin)
NCJ 232434

In addition to providing the latest overview of state transfer laws and practices, this bulletin comprehensively examines available state-level data on juveniles adjudicated in the criminal justice system. In documenting state reporting practices regarding the criminal processing of youth and identifying critical information gaps, it represents an important step forward in understanding the impact of state transfer laws. The bulletin is part of the Juvenile Offenders and Victims National Report series, which offers a comprehensive statistical overview of the problems of juvenile crime, violence, and victimization and the response of the juvenile justice system.

To order a printed copy, visit the NCJRS Web site.

Cover of Journal of Juvenile Justice Journal of Juvenile Justice

OJJDP recently launched the Journal of Juvenile Justice a semi-annual, peer-reviewed journal that addresses a variety of issues in juvenile justice, ranging from delinquency prevention to evaluation of treatment approaches. The inaugural issue discusses topics ranging from the unique risk factors associated with crossover youth to the benefits of comprehensive restorative justice programs.

The Journal of Juvenile Justice is accessible online.


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Coordinating Council on Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention logo
News From the Coordinating Council on Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention

The Coordinating Council on Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention held a meeting
on October 21, 2011, at the Office of Justice Programs in Washington, DC. Included on the agenda were presentations on strengthening military families by Robert Gordon, Deputy Assistant Secretary of Defense, Office of Children and Youth, and other speakers.

Also on the agenda were updates on the Supportive School Discipline Initiative, a joint effort between the U.S. Departments of Education and Justice to target school disciplinary policies and in-school arrests that push youth out of school and into the justice system; the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development-GreatSchools partnership to help inform families' housing and education decisions; and the White House Council for Community Solutions.

More information about the meeting will be available in the next issue of OJJDP News @ a Glance.

Visit the Web site to learn more about the council and read minutes from past meetings.

The Coordinating Council on Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention is an independent body within the executive branch of the federal government operated under the Federal Advisory Committee Act. The Council's primary functions are to coordinate federal juvenile delinquency prevention programs, federal programs and activities that detain or care for unaccompanied juveniles, and federal programs relating to missing and exploited children.

The council is made up of 22 members—13 ex officio and affiliate members and 9 practitioners. The ex officio members are: the Attorney General; the Administrator of the Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention; the Secretaries of the U.S. Departments of Education, Health and Human Services (HHS), Housing and Urban Development, and Labor; the Assistant Secretary of Immigration and Customs Enforcement in the U.S. Department of Homeland Security; the Director of the Office of National Drug Control Policy; and the Chief Executive Officer of the Corporation for National and Community Service. Affiliate members are the Secretaries of the U.S. Departments of Agriculture, Defense, and the Interior, and the Administrator of the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration of HHS. The nine juvenile justice practitioner members are appointed by the Speaker of the House of Representatives, the Senate Majority Leader, and the President of the United States.


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Federal Advisory Committee on Juvenile Justice logo
News From the Federal Advisory Committee on Juvenile Justice

The organizing meeting for the newly constituted Federal Advisory Committee on Juvenile Justice (FACJJ) took place on October 11, 2011. The agenda included an introduction of members and the election of a chairperson and vice chairperson.

OJJDP restructured FACJJ to allow for greater flexibility and responsiveness. The reorganized FACJJ is made up of 14 primary members, each representing a group of states and U.S. territories for a period of 2 years (with the possibility of being reappointed for a second term) and 14 alternate members. Also planned are several subcommittees composed of FACJJ members and other experts.

The new FACJJ is deliberately structured as a relatively small working advisory committee. It presents the opportunity to engage in deeper communication and collaboration with the leadership and staff of OJJDP, to forge stronger relationships among states and territories with mutual interests, and to provide more timely responses to legislative, policy, and program matters.

A complete list of members is shown below. More information about the October 11 meeting will be available in the next issue of OJJDP News @ a Glance.

The committee's meetings are open to the public; anyone may register to attend and observe. Additional information is available on the committee's Web site.

FACJJ Members
Primary Members (Term: October 1, 2011–September 30, 2013)

Dalene Anne Dutton
Tony R. Jones
Robert Listenbee, Jr.
Robin L. Lubitz
ViEve Martin Kohrs
Jim Moeser
Raquel Montoya-Lewis
Claudio Martin Kotomor Norita
Christine Perra Rapillo
Haley Rae Reimbold
Reginald Robinson
John B. Roe IV
Symone D. Sanders
Dean R. Williams
Alternate Members (Term: October 1, 2011–September 30, 2013)
Aileen Jo Artero
Pat S. Berckman
Richard Broderick
Susan Colling
Joseph Diament
Martha Doyle
William H. Feyerherm
Kenya Shantel Lee
Timothy McBride
Liz Mueller
Maria Estela Quintanilla
Pili J. Robinson
George W. Timberlake
Linda Whittington

The Federal Advisory Committee on Juvenile Justice is a consultative body established by the Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention Act of 1974, as amended (Section 223) and supported by OJJDP. Composed of members of state advisory groups on juvenile justice, the committee advises the President and Congress on matters related to juvenile justice, evaluates the progress and accomplishments of juvenile justice activities and projects, and advises the OJJDP Administrator on the work of OJJDP.



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