Special Feature: Impaired Driving - Prevention

Publications and Online Materials

Increasing Alcohol Ignition Interlock Use: Success Practices for States
Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and National Highway Traffic Safety Administration, September 2016

Reduce Post-Interlock Recidivism: Alcohol Ignition Interlocks Plus Treatment for DUI Offenders
Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, February 2016

Evaluation of State Ignition Interlock Programs: Interlock Use Analyses From 28 States, 2006–2011
National Highway Traffic Safety Administration, May 2015

Drug-Impaired Driving: Additional Support Needed for Public Awareness Initiatives
Government Accountability Office, February 2015

Model Guideline for State Ignition Interlock Programs
National Highway Traffic Safety Administration, November 2013

Ignition Interlock Institutes: Promoting the Use of Interlocks and Improvements to Interlock Programs
National Highway Traffic Safety Administration, July 2013

Community-Based Impaired-Driving Programs: Local Ordinances and Other Strategies Addressing Impaired Driving
National Highway Traffic Safety Administration, September 2012

Case Studies of Ignition Interlock Programs
National Highway Traffic Safety Administration, April 2012

Working to Reduce Drugged Driving and Protect Public Health and Safety
Office of National Drug Control Policy, April 2012

Teen Drugged Driving: Parent, Coalition and Community Group Activity Guide
Office of National Drug Control Policy, October 2011

Working to Get Drugged Drivers Off the Road
Office of National Drug Control Policy, November 2010

Drug-Impaired Driving: Understanding the Problem and Ways to Reduce It: A Report to Congress
National Highway Traffic Safety Administration, December 2009

A Campaign to Reduce Impaired Driving Through Retail-Oriented Enforcement in Washington State
National Highway Traffic Safety Administration, April 2008

Effectiveness of Federal Drunk Driving Programs
Office of the Inspector General, October 2007

Uniform Guidelines for State Highway Safety Programs: Impaired Driving
National Highway Traffic Safety Administration, November 2006

Impaired Driving Guidebook: Three Keys to Renewed Focus and Success
National Highway Traffic Safety Administration, No publication date indicated

Search the NCJRS Abstracts Database for additional resources on this topic.

Prevention Campaigns

Buzzed Driving is Drunk Driving
This campaign seeks to inspire dialogue and recognition of the dangers of "buzzed" driving and subsequently, to motivate people to stop driving buzzed. The overall campaign hopes to educate people that consuming even a few drinks can impair driving and that Buzzed Driving is Drunk Driving.

Drive Sober or Get Pulled Over
This campaign and the associated promotional planners provide marketing materials, earned media tools and marketing ideas to support local impaired driving initiatives surrounding the National Enforcement Crackdown.

Related Resources

National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA)
The mission of the NHTSA is to save lives, prevent injuries and reduce the economic costs due to road traffic crashes. NHTSA's Impaired Driving and Stop Impaired Driving pages provide links to research, data, prevention and law enforcement campaigns, and more.

National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism (NIAAA)
NIAAA provides leadership in the national effort to reduce alcohol-related problems. NIAAA’s Underage Drinking page provides data on a variety of factors, including drunk driving among youth.

Sobering Facts: Drunk Driving State Fact Sheets
On this Centers for Disease Control and Prevention site, find state-specific fact sheets that provide a snapshot of alcohol-involved deaths and drunk driving and an overview of proven strategies to reduce or prevent drunk driving.

Links from the NCJRS website to non-federal sites do not constitute an endorsement by NCJRS or its sponsors. NCJRS is not responsible for the content or privacy policy of any off-site pages that are referenced, nor does NCJRS guarantee the accuracy, completeness, timeliness, or correct sequencing of information. NCJRS is also not responsible for the use of, or results obtained from the use of, the information. It is the responsibility of the user to evaluate the content and usefulness of information obtained from non-federal sites.