ONDCP Seal
PolicyPolicy
IV. Agency Budget Summaries

DEPARTMENT OF LABOR


  1. RESOURCE SUMMARY

  2. METHODOLOGY

    • Adult and Youth Training Grants drug resource levels are derived by estimating the drug incidence among likely Job Training Partnership Act (JTPA) participants using data from the 1991 National Household Survey, and applying average program cost per participant to estimate the total substance abuse prevention costs for the JTPA Title II-A Adult Training Grant and Title II-C Youth Training Grant programs. Participation in these job training programs is recognized as not only a means to gaining employment but also as a means to deter drug and alcohol abuse.

    • The Job Corps Program administers the Alcohol and Other Drugs of Abuse (AODA) component which consists of a comprehensive drug prevention and intervention program for all Job Corps participants. Estimated Job Corps cost formulations are based on estimated expenses for enrollee drug testing, counseling, education, and referral to treatment, if necessary, to serve the budgeted number of students.

    • Funding in the Departmental Management account is necessary to support the continued operation of the DOL Drug-Free Workplace Program, and was determined based on the Department's previous experience with these programs. The Drug-Free Workplace program also supports outreach and information dissemination initiatives, including the Working Partners Small Businesses Initiative, which promotes the establishment of substance abuse prevention programs in the private and non-Federal public sectors.

  3. PROGRAM SUMMARY

    • The Employment and Training Administration (ETA) administers the Job Training Partnership Act programs of Adult and Youth Training Grants. These programs require individual assessments and specifically encourage outreach activities aimed at individuals who face severe barriers to employment, such as drug and alcohol abuse. Program activities include coordination of JTPA programs with other community service organizations, such as drug and alcohol abuse prevention and treatment programs. JTPA also authorizes the Jobs Corps, the Alcohol and Other Drugs of Abuse (AODA) component to screen trainees for drug and alcohol problems and provide prevention and intervention services.

    • Job Corps has had an active program of alcohol and drug testing and counseling since January 1992. The Job Corps AODA component became operational in all centers and is considered an important step forward in identifying alcohol and substance abusers and assisting them in combating their abuse problem. Job Corps has implemented a "Zero Tolerance for Violence and Drugs" policy. Applicants are required to sign a drug free certification and a contract committing to abide by this policy. Refusal to sign this contract will preclude entry into the program.

    • Job Corps has redirected its efforts in providing services to students with substance abuse problems. Emphasis is placed on short-term intervention and counseling, shifting from a medical to a behavioral approach.

    • Presently, services provided in Job Corps for most medical conditions related to substance abuse are sufficient to cope with the problems of the vast majority of the students while they are in training. These services consist of both short-term individual and group counseling for those students who test positive for alcohol and other illicit drugs, and where appropriate, medication to counteract substance-related symptoms. However, when more intensive and long-term treatment is required, the student is terminated and returned home with a referral to an appropriate health facility for treatment. Job Corps is not designed to administer such long-term treatment.

    • Job Corps has, in general, been successful in recruiting qualified substance abuse counselors and other health personnel. Currently, all centers are required to employ, at a minimum, one full-time substance abuse counselor (AODA Specialist). Instructions have been issued to all centers requiring that state or national certification be obtained or sought by all center AODA specialists.

    • The ETA also has responsibility for administering the new $3 billion Welfare-to-Work (WTW) grants initiative. WTW targets welfare recipients who face multiple barriers to employment -- such as school dropouts, substance abusers, and those with a poor work history -- and who are long-term welfare recipients (30 months or more) or who face termination from Temporary Assistance for Needy Families (TANF) within 12 months. Some of these funds will be used for substance abuse education, counseling and treatment.

    • ETA is also funding projects which include: the Federal Bonding Program (FBP), which enables former substance abusers and others with a criminal background to qualify for fidelity bonding at no cost to the employer or employee.

    • DOL funds its Drug-Free Workplace Program which includes employee education, supervisory training, employee drug testing, and an employee assistance program for Department employees and their family members. DOL's Office of the Assistant Secretary for Policy (ASP) also operates an outreach and information dissemination program to assist employers and labor unions to establish effective workplace substance abuse prevention and intervention programs. This effort, now known as Working Partners for an Alcohol- and Drug-free American Workplace has consolidated two distinct existing program components, the Small Business Initiative (SBI) and the Substance Abuse Information Database (SAID), into one integrated program. SBI (formerly the only component designated as Working Partners) enlists national trade and professional associations to distribute industry-specific information developed by DOL to their members and to encourage and support businesses to implement programs. SAID is an on-line, searchable collection of documents including sample policies, training and educational materials, and information on applicable federal and state laws and regulations that are useful in developing workplace prevention programs. Together these initiatives now constitute the Working Partners program intended to raise awareness about the negative impact of substance abuse on workplace safety, health and productivity and to provide the tools with which to address it.

    • Working Partners contributes not only to the reduction of health and social costs by deterring workplace drug use and providing opportunities for intervention and referral to treatment, but additionally contributes to preventing youth drug use by arming parents and other influential adults with the knowledge they need to communicate effectively with children about drugs. Furthermore, the increased prevalence of drug-free workplace programs sends a clear message to youth as they enter the workforce that drug use is not acceptable. Workplaces that have substance abuse programs in place are also receptive candidates for inclusion in community-based coalitions formed to help prevent drug use and abuse.

  4. BUDGET SUMMARY

    1998 Program

    Goal 1: Educate and enable America's youth to reject illegal drugs as well as the use of alcohol and tobacco.

    • The total drug control request for Goal 1 activities for FY 1998 is $27.8 million.

      • While the Employment and Training Administration (ETA) and its program operators do not operate drug prevention or treatment programs, the Job Training Partnership Act (JTPA) allows and encourages certain activities concerned with substance abuse prevention but in most areas does not mandate such activities. Decisions on which participants are provided what types of services under JTPA are reserved to States and localities.

      • Job Corps has had an active program of alcohol and drug testing and counseling since January 1992. The Job Corps Alcohol and Other Drugs of Abuse (AODA) component became operational in all centers and is considered an important step forward in identifying alcohol and substance abusers and assisting them in combating their abuse problem. On May 1, 1995, Job Corps implemented a Zero Tolerance for Violence and Drugs policy. Applicants are required to sign a drug free certification and a contract committing to abide by this policy. Refusal to sign this contract will preclude entry into the program.

    Goal 3: Reduce health and social costs to the public of illegal drug use.

    • The total drug control request for Goal 3 activities for FY 1998 is $38.8 million.

      • While it is important to note that JTPA is a job training program and not a substance abuse treatment program, the transitioning of the disadvantaged and unemployed into self-sustaining employment sometimes requires dealing with a participant's substance abuse problem. JPTA and other ETA program operations are required to provide increased substance abuse prevention education/counseling and referral services for individuals at risk of abusing drugs or alcohol.

      • Funding in the Departmental Management account supports the continued operation of the DOL's Drug-Free Workplace Program and as well as its Working Partners outreach and information dissemination efforts. Ongoing Working Partners activities include maintaining and refining the functionality of the SAID system and expanding the number and types of documents available in SAID. These enhancements are intended to make SAID more responsive to the needs of its users and ultimately to increase the number of employers and employees that benefit from the wealth of information residing in SAID to implement effective workplace programs.

    1999 Request

    Goal 1: Educate and enable America's youth to reject illegal drugs as well as the use of alcohol and tobacco.

    • The total drug control request for Goal 1 activities for FY 1999 is $28.1 million, a net increase of $0.4 million over FY 1998, supporting programs at approximately the FY 1998 level.

    Goal 3: Reduce health and social costs to the public of illegal drug use.

    • The total drug control request for Goal 3 activities for FY 1999 is $40.6 million, a net increase of $1.8 million over FY 1998, supporting programs at approximately the FY 1998 level.

  5. PROGRAM ACCOMPLISHMENTS

    • The amended Job Training Partnership Act (P.L. 102-367) allows costs for participant counseling on avoiding substance abuse.

    • Job Corps has strengthened new student enrollment procedures by implementing a "Zero Tolerance for violence and Drugs" policy, requiring applicants to sign a drug free certification and a contract committing to abide by this policy. Students who are detected as not being drug-free by the end of a 30-day probationary period will be terminated from the program and cannot re-enroll for a period of six-months. Re-application to this program must be accompanied by evidence of a negative drug test.

    • The Job Corps AODA component tests for, educates, and counsels participants on substance abuse. The Department believes that substance abuse contributes to higher absenteeism and turnover which results in lower productivity at a time when improved U.S. competitiveness is critical to the nation's growth.

    • The Federal Bonding Program (FBP) is operated by ETA through the State Employment Security/Job Service in each state. This program enables former substance abusers and others with a criminal background, who otherwise would be unable to obtain employment, acquire bonding, to qualify for fidelity bonding at no cost to the employer or employee.

    • The Welfare-to-Work initiative targets services to the adult welfare population who are most at risk of long-term welfare dependency. A major feature of the new initiative is that at least 70 percent of grant funds are to be spent on recipients who face multiple barriers to employment, such as substance abuse.

    • Completed conversion of the Working Partners' Substance Abuse Information Database (SAID) from a disk format to a fully searchable Web site that is free and accessible to anyone on the Internet. SAID now features summaries and full text of several hundred workplace substance-abuse related studies, surveys, reports, case studies and state/territory laws and regulations. Substantial enhancements to SAID such as a detailed "Search the Database" screen; image maps that display state/territory laws, regulations and resources; and "help" buttons have increased the functionality of the system.

    • Working Partners/Small Business Initiative (SBI) has been extremely successful in raising awareness throughout the association community, reaching more than 300 association executives and enlisting more than 100 associations to actively share information with their members who are predominantly small business owners. Through this partnership, DOL has provided information on how to establish workplace substance abuse prevention programs to more than 500,000 employers. Numerous articles, based on information provided by DOL on workplace substance abuse have appeared in trade publications, magazines, newsletters and newspapers -- notably those geared to small business executives. More than 200 Working Partners/Small Business kits are requested per month.

    • DOL successfully collaborated with the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA) and the Small Business Administration (SBA) to analyze the results of the questions regarding worker drug use and workplace policies and programs which, as a result of this ongoing collaboration, were included in the 1994 National Household Survey on Drug Abuse. The recently published report confirms concerns that drug users are more likely to work in smaller establishments, which also report fewer workplace substance abuse policies or programs, than in larger work establishments and underscores the need to encourage and assist small employers in this area.

    • The Department of Labor's workplace substance abuse home page is being renamed the (Working Partners for an Alcohol- and Drug-Free American Workplace) Web site. This site, which has been expanded, refined and enhanced, contains information on all of DOL's workplace substance abuse prevention programs.