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Security Concepts and Operational Issues
(Chapter 1   The Big Picture, Continued)

Why security technologies have not been embraced by schools in the past

Anyone working in the security field is aware that there are thousands of security products on the market. Some of them are excellent, but many claim to be "the very best of its kind." And, unfortunately, there are a significant number of customers in the country who have been less than pleased with the ultimate cost, maintenance requirements, and effectiveness of security technologies they have purchased. Schools have been no exception to this and have a few inherent problems of their own:

  • Schools do not usually have the funding for aggressive and complete security programs.
  • Schools generally lack the ability to procure effective security technology products and services at the lowest bid.
  • Many school security programs cannot afford to hire well-trained security personnel.
  • School administrators and their staff rarely have training or experience in security technologies.
  • Schools have no infrastructures in place for maintaining or upgrading security devices-when something breaks, it is often difficult to have it repaired or replaced.
  • Issues of privacy and potential civil rights lawsuits may prohibit or complicate the use of some technologies.

Table 1

The issues come down to applying security technologies in schools that are effective, affordable, and politically acceptable but still useful within these difficult constraints.

 



Research Report:   The Appropriate and Effective Use of Security Technologies in U.S. Schools