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NCJ Number: 226457 Find in a Library
Title: Bruising as a Forensic Marker of Physical Elder Abuse
Author(s): Aileen Wiglesworth Ph.D.; Raciela Austin R.N.; Maria Corona M.S.; Laura Mosqueda M.D.
Date Published: February 2009
Page Count: 27
Sponsoring Agency: National Institute of Justice (NIJ)
Washington, DC 20531
National Institute of Justice/NCJRS
Rockville, MD 20849
NCJRS Photocopy Services
Rockville, MD 20849-6000
Grant Number: 2005-IJ-CX-0048
Sale Source: National Institute of Justice/NCJRS
Box 6000
Rockville, MD 20849
United States of America

NCJRS Photocopy Services
Box 6000
Rockville, MD 20849-6000
United States of America
Document: PDF
Dataset: DATASET 1
Type: Report (Study/Research)
Format: Document - Designates non-commercial publications, such as Government and gray literature reports.
Language: English
Country: United States of America
Annotation: Sixty-seven adults ages 65 and older reported to adult protective services for suspected physical elder abuse were examined to document the location and size of bruises and assess whether they were inflicted during physical abuse.
Abstract: The study found that bruises which occurred as a result of physical elder mistreatment were often large (greater than 5 cm) and were located on the face, the lateral right arm, or the posterior torso. Forty-eight (72 percent) of the older adults who were determined to have been physically abused within 30 days prior to the examination had bruises. Eighty-nine of the 155 examined bruises (60 percent), were reported by the older adults to be inflicted, 26 (14.2 percent) were accidental, and 40 (25.8 percent) were of unknown cause. When the current study population was compared to a group of elders in an earlier study who had not been abused, the physically abused elders were found to have significantly larger bruises, and more of them reported the cause of their bruises. Based on these findings, older adults with bruises should be asked about the cause of the bruises in order to determine whether physical abuse occurred. Reports of bruising inflicted by others should be reported to adult protective services, the police, or other investigating agency. Based on self-reports and the medical exam, an expert panel confirmed physical abuse. Findings were compared with the results of an earlier study of accidental bruising in older adults. Data obtained were age; sex; ethnicity; functional status; medical conditions; cognitive status; history of falls; bruise size, location, and recall of cause; and response to the Revised Conflict Tactics Scale items and Elder Abuse Inventory. 3 tables and 22 references
Main Term(s): Elderly victims
Index Term(s): Crime detection; Crimes against the elderly; Elder Abuse; Evidence identification and analysis; NIJ final report
To cite this abstract, use the following link:
http://www.ncjrs.gov/App/publications/abstract.aspx?ID=248452

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