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NCJRS Abstract

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NCJ Number: 247505 Find in a Library
Title: Stay With or Leave the Abuser?: The Effects of Domestic Violence Victim’s Decision on Attributions Made by Young Adults
Journal: Journal of Family Violence  Volume:29  Issue:1  Dated:January 2014  Pages:35-49
Author(s): Megan McPherson Halket; Katelyn Gormley; Nicole Mello; Lori Rosenthal; Marsha Pravder Mirkin
Date Published: January 2014
Page Count: 15
Document: HTML|PDF
Type: Report (Study/Research)
Format: Article
Language: English
Country: United States of America
Annotation: Two studies were designed that investigated attributions made by young adults when women either stay with or leave an abusive husband and whether educating the participants about prevalence of domestic violence and risks of leaving mitigate negative judgments.
Abstract: While negative attributions are often made toward female victims of domestic violence, studies have not explored whether attributions shift contingent upon whether women stay with or leave abusive husbands. Further, no studies investigated whether negative attributions decrease if the participants receive information about the prevalence of domestic violence or the risks inherent in leaving an abuser. Therefore, two studies were designed that investigated attributions made by young adults when women either stay with or leave an abusive husband and whether educating the participants about prevalence of domestic violence and risks of leaving mitigate negative judgments. In both studies, young adults responded to surveys assessing attributions toward a female heterosexual victim of domestic violence. Results indicated that participants made more positive attributions about her personality characteristics and parenting ability if a woman left the relationship. Informing students beforehand about potential risks of leaving and personal experience with domestic violence did not erase this effect, but interactions mitigated some of the effects. Results suggest that educating young adults about risks of violence while useful, is not sufficient to change blaming attitudes. Educators may instead need to challenge the attribution process. Further research involving attributions toward gay and lesbian victims of domestic violence is suggested. Abstract published by arrangement with Springer.
Main Term(s): Domestic/Intimate Partner Violence
Index Term(s): Abused spouse profiles; Attitudes; Attribution theory
To cite this abstract, use the following link:
http://www.ncjrs.gov/App/publications/abstract.aspx?ID=269605

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