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NCJ Number: 202244 Find in a Library
Title: Analysis of Minority Youth Representation
Corporate Author: Alaska Dept of Health and Social Services
Division of Juvenile Justice
United States of America
Date Published: September 2001
Page Count: 39
Sponsoring Agency: Alaska Dept of Health and Social Services
Juneau, AK 99811
Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention
Washington, DC 20531
Grant Number: 99-JF-CX-0002
Sale Source: Alaska Dept of Health and Social Services
Division of Juvenile Justice
240 Main Street, Suit 701
P.O. Box 110635
Juneau, AK 99811
United States of America
Document: PDF
Publisher: http://health.hss.state.ak.us/djj/ 
Type: Statistics
Format: Document (Online)
Language: English
Country: United States of America
Annotation: This report analyzes the existence of minority overrepresentation (MOR) in Alaska’s Division of Juvenile Justice, as well as Disproportionate Minority Confinement (DMC).
Abstract: In order to determine if minority overrepresentation (MOR) and Disproportionate Minority Confinement (DMC) exist in Alaska’s juvenile justice system, this report explores the issue of MOR and DMC in Alaska. The analysis was federally supported by the U.S. Department of Justice, Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention (OJJDP). The scope of this analysis was limited to the Division of Juvenile Justice’s (DJJ) portion of Alaska’s juvenile justice system. The report discusses the following subjects: (1) methodology used to conduct the analysis; (2) overview of Alaska’s juvenile justice system; (3) population data used in the analysis; (4) specific points where minority overrepresentation exists; (5) racial distribution of the DJJ workforce; and (6) DJJ’s current plan to address MOR and DMC issues. The report identified six major decision points where significant minority overrepresentation exists and that are primarily within the jurisdiction of the DJJ. They include: (1) overrepresentation of African-American youth referred for probation violations; (2) overrepresentation of African-American youth whose referral includes a request for preadjudicatory detention resulting in secure detention; (3) overrepresentation of Native American youth whose referral includes a request for preadjudicatory detention resulting in Attendant Care Shelter placement; (4) overrepresentation of African-American youth whose delinquency report has an investigation outcome of Petitioned; (5) near overrepresentation of African-American youth whose court disposition in Adjudicated; and (6) overrepresentation of African-American and Native American youth in the more restrictive supervision levels of maximum, medium, and correctional institution. This analysis suggests that the multiplier effect does exist within the DJJ with particular respect to African-American youth. Further research will include determining the extent and causes of this disparate processing. Tables, figures, and appendix
Main Term(s): Minority overrepresentation
Index Term(s): Alaska; Black juvenile delinquents; Black/African Americans; Juvenile justice reform; Juvenile offenders; Juvenile statistics; Minority juvenile offenders; OJJDP grant-related documents; Racial discrimination
Note: Downloaded on September 29, 2003.
To cite this abstract, use the following link:
http://www.ncjrs.gov/App/publications/abstract.aspx?ID=202244

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