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NCJ Number: 249380 Find in a Library
Title: Effects of Merging Proactive CCTV Monitoring With Directed Police Patrol: A Randomized Controlled Trial
Journal: Journal of Experimental Criminology  Volume:11  Issue:1  Dated:March 2015  Pages:43-69
Author(s): Eric L. Piza; Joel M. Caplan; Leslie W. Kennedy; Andrew M. Gilchrist
Date Published: March 2015
Page Count: 27
Sponsoring Agency: National Institute of Justice (NIJ)
Washington, DC 20531
Grant Number: 2010-IJ-CX-0026
Document: HTML
Type: Program/Project Description; Program/Project Evaluation; Report (Grant Sponsored); Report (Study/Research); Research (Applied/Empirical)
Format: Article; Document (Online)
Language: English
Country: United States of America
Annotation: This study was designed to test the effect of increased certainty of punishment on reported crime levels in CCTV target areas of Newark, NJ.
Abstract: The program’s intent was to overcome specific surveillance barriers that minimize the effectiveness of CCTV, namely high camera-to-operator ratios and the differential response policy of police dispatch. An additional camera operator was deployed to monitor specific CCTV cameras, with two patrol cars dedicated to exclusively responding to incidents of concern detected on the experimental cameras. Overall, the study findings support the hypothesis that the integration of CCTV with proactive police activity generates a crime control benefit greater than what research suggests is achievable via “stand-alone” camera deployment, particularly in the case of street-level crime. The experimental strategy was associated with significant reductions in violent crime and social disorder in the treatment areas compared to the control areas. Incidence Rate Ratio (IRR) and Total Net Effect (TNE) values suggest that the number of crime incidents prevented was sizable in numerous instances. The experiment had much less of an effect on narcotics activity, however. A randomized controlled trial was implemented in the analysis. A randomized block design was used to assign each of the 38 CCTV schemes to either a treatment or control group. Schemes were grouped into pairs based upon their levels of three types of calls for service: violent crime, social disorder, and narcotics activity. Negative binomial regression models tested the effect that assignment to the treatment group had on levels of the aforementioned crime categories. (Publisher abstract modified)
Main Term(s): Police research
Index Term(s): Closed circuit television (CCTV); Electronic surveillance; New Jersey; NIJ grant-related documents; NIJ Resources; Patrol procedures; Police effectiveness; Police resource allocation; Proactive police units
To cite this abstract, use the following link:
http://www.ncjrs.gov/App/publications/abstract.aspx?ID=271524

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