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NCJ Number: 249803 Find in a Library
Title: Census of Problem-Solving Courts, 2012
Series: BJS Bulletins
Author(s): Suzanne M. Strong; Ramona R. Rantala; Tracey Kyckelhahn
Corporate Author: Bureau of Justice Statistics (BJS)
US Dept of Justice
Office of Justice Programs
United States of America
Date Published: September 2016
Page Count: 28
Sponsoring Agency: Bureau of Justice Statistics (BJS)
Washington, DC 20531
Document: Agency Summary|PDF (Full Report)|PDF (Summary)|Text
Agency Summary: http://www.bjs.gov/index.cfm?ty=pbdetail&iid=5744 
Type: Statistics
Format: Document; Document (Online)
Language: English
Country: United States of America
Annotation: This Bureau of Justice Statistics report describes type, location, and characteristics of all known problem-solving courts in 2012.
Abstract: This Bureau of Justice Statistics report describes type, location, and characteristics of all known problem-solving courts in 2012. Types of problem-solving courts include drug, mental health, family, youth specialty, hybrid DWI/drug, DWI, domestic violence, veterans, tribal wellness, and other specialty courts. The report presents information on various aspects of problem-solving courts, such as funding sources, disqualifying offenses, points of entry, status hearings, services, and benefits to participants. It also examines differences between adult and juvenile drug and mental health courts. Data are from the 2012 Census of Problem-Solving Courts. Highlights include: 1) in 2012, 65% of all problem-solving courts accepted cases after the defendant entered a guilty plea; 2) more than half (56%) of problem-solving courts in 2012 did not accept applicants with a history of violent crime and nearly two-thirds (65%) did not accept applicants with a history of sex offenses; 3) in 38% of veterans courts and 11% of domestic violence courts, applicants with a history of violent crime were ineligible; 4) fifty-three percent of all problem-solving courts active in 2012 were established prior to 2005; and 5) most veterans courts (55%) were established between 2011 and 2012.
Main Term(s): Courts; Courts (Types of)
Index Term(s): BJS Resources; Bureau of Justice Statistics (BJS); Drug Courts; Family courts; Juvenile courts; Mental Health Courts; Specialty Courts; Teen Courts
Note: Revised October 12, 2016
To cite this abstract, use the following link:
http://www.ncjrs.gov/App/publications/abstract.aspx?ID=271950

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