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NCJ Number: 250633 Find in a Library
Title: Virtually Standing Up or Standing By? Correlates of Enacting Social Control Online
Author(s): Matthew Costello; James Hawdon; Amanda Cross
Date Published: February 2017
Page Count: 13
Sponsoring Agency: Bureau of Justice Statistics (BJS)
Washington, DC 20531
Grant Number: 2014-ZA-BX-0014
Document: HTML|PDF
Type: Research (Applied/Empirical)
Format: Article
Language: English
Country: United States of America
Annotation: This article presents the finding of a study that examined the “bystander effect,” the tendency of individuals to not intervene on behalf of others in emergency situations, in an online setting, focusing on factors that lead individuals to intervene, and therefore enact informal social control, on behalf of others who are being targeted by hate material.
Abstract: Research has consistently established the robustness of the bystander effect, or the tendency of individuals to not intervene on behalf of others in emergency situations. This study examines the bystander effect in an online setting, focusing on factors that lead individuals to intervene, and therefore enact informal social control, on behalf of others who are being targeted by hate material. To address this question, we use an online survey (N=647) of youth and young adults recruited from a demographically balanced sample of Americans. Results demonstrate that the enactment of social control is positively affected by the existence of strong offline and online social bonds, collective efficacy, prior victimization, self-esteem, and an aversion for the hate material in question. Additionally, the amount of time that individuals spend online affects their likelihood of intervention. These findings provide important insights into the processes that underlie informal social control and begin to bridge the gap in knowledge between social control in the physical and virtual realms. (Published abstract)
Main Term(s): Witness intervention in crime
Index Term(s): Crisis intervention; Early intervention; Online Victimization; Social control; Social control theory; social engagement; Victimization
To cite this abstract, use the following link:
http://www.ncjrs.gov/App/publications/abstract.aspx?ID=272800

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