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Guidelines for Victim-Sensitive Victim-Offender Mediation: Restorative Justice Through Dialogue

Mark S. Umbreit, Ph.D., Director
Jean Greenwood, M.Div., Former Training Coordinator

Center for Restorative Justice & Peacemaking
(formerly Center for Restorative Justice & Mediation)
School of Social Work, University of Minnesota
St. Paul, Minnesota

April 2000

Guidelines for Victim-Sensitive Victim-Offender Mediation: Restorative Justice Through Dialogue

 

U.S. Department of Justice
Office of Justice Programs

810 Seventh Street NW.
Washington, DC 20531

Janet Reno
Attorney General

Daniel Marcus
Acting Associate Attorney General

Mary Lou Leary
Acting Assistant Attorney General

Kathryn M. Turman
Director, Office for Victims of Crime

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Office of Justice Programs
World Wide Web Home Page
www.ojp.usdoj.gov

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Office for Victims of Crime
World Wide Web Home Page
www.ovc.gov

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For grant and funding information contact
U.S. Department of Justice Response Center
1-800-421-6770

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OVC Resource Center
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OVC Resource Center Home Page
www.ncjrs.gov

NCJ 176346

This document was prepared by the Center for Restorative Justice & Peacemaking (formerly the Center for Restorative Justice & Mediation) under grant number 96–VF–GX–K006, awarded by the Office for Victims of Crime, Office of Justice Programs, U.S. Department of Justice. The opinions, findings, and conclusions or recommendations expressed in this document are those of the author and do not necessarily represent the official position of the U.S. Department of Justice.

 


Contents:

Message From the Director

Acknowledgments

Executive Summary

I. Victim-Offender Mediation:
   A National Perspective

What Is It?

When Are Cases Referred?

How Is It Different From Other Kinds of Mediation?

Are Crime Victims Interested?

How Many Programs Exist?

What Have We Learned From Research?

II. Guidelines for Victim-Sensitive Mediation and Dialogue With Offenders

Purpose of Victim-Offender Mediation

Underlying Principles of Victim-Offender Mediation

Guidelines for Victim-Sensitive Mediation

III. Recommendations for Program Development

Program Recommendations

Training Recommendations

IV. Summary

Appendix A. Results of Survey of Victim-Offender Mediation Programs in the United States

Appendix B. What Is Humanistic Mediation?

Appendix C. Profiles of Programs

Appendix D. Promising Practices

Bibliography

Contact Information

PDF and ASCII Files

 

The Office for Victims of Crime is a component of the Office of Justice Programs, which also includes the Bureau of Justice Assistance, the Bureau of Justice Statistics, the National Institute of Justice, and the Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention.

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